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Pinot Noir for every day

September 12, 2018 1 comment

Andy at MacArthur Beverages is stocking on on domestic wines priced under $40 per bottle for the holiday season.  The 2014 St. Innocent, Pinot Noir, Zenith Vineyard, Eola-Amity Hills is one of his new selections.  Priced at $27 it is firmly within my grasp and after tasting a bottle, it should be within yours.  This may be one of the entry-level selections but it delivers on flavor and ability to develop.  I recommend you grab enough bottles so you can try one now and the rest in a few years.  You might want to drink it each day of the week.

2014 St. Innocent, Pinot Noir, Zenith Vineyard, Eola-Amity Hills – $27
This wine is 100% Pinot Noir fermented in both stainless steel and oak then aged for 16 months in oak barrels.  Alcohol 13.9%.  The flavors of Pinot fruit are slightly dense, dark, and closely played.  The fruit-weight impressions is integrated with the acidity providing a satisfying experience through the finish where young tannins zip in at the end.  I found the wine oscillates with notes of black fruit and stones.  I am quite sure it will develop and open up over the next few years.  ***(*) Now – 2025.

The well-flavored 2015 Arterberry Maresh, Pinot Noir, Dundee Hills

September 6, 2018 2 comments

The 2015 Arterberry Maresh, Pinot Noir, Dundee Hills reflects long family roots in Oregon winemaking.  It is not what I would call modern, being pure in fruit with ethereal flavors made even more engaging by a surprisingly oily body and mineral end.  It is a steal at $25 per bottle and remains confirmation of Dick Erath’s opinion that Pinot Noir would grow well here.  It is advice the Maresh family accepted when they planted their vineyard in 1970.  Grab what you can at MacArthur Beverages.

2015 Arterberry Maresh, Pinot Noir, Dundee Hills – $25
Alcohol 14%.  A good Pinot nose.  Ripe flavors of strawberry are lifted and ethereal, existing around a core of firmer, cherry flavor.  There is watering acidity throughout and a touch of structure at the end to support a bit more development.  With air, this mouth filling wine takes on an oily body, mineral end, and hint of baking spices.  It is well-flavored, pure, and enjoyable right now.  ***(*) Now – 2025.

A tasty pair of wines

Just a quick note for today on two other wines tasted at Sudip’s house.  It is here that four of us were intrigued by the 2014 Goodfellow Family Cellars, Chardonnay, Durant Vineyard.   At this stage, the wine is still a bit tight but all of the components give you a sense of things to come.  This is a fine, fresh wine which balances white fruit with ripeness and fat.  Elegant and not bombastic.  From the dump cart I picked up a few bottles of 1997 Harrison Winery & Vineyards, Millenium Merlot 2000, Napa Valley thinking they would be good as an affordable party wine.   We all enjoyed the perfectly mature flavors so much that I decided not to serve them at the party!  At $10 this is a great dump bin find.

2014 Goodfellow Family Cellars, Chardonnay, Durant Vineyard – $37
This wine is 100% Chardonnay sourced from vines on volcanic soils in Dundee Hills.  Alcohol 13.4%.  Flavors of white peach and green apple mix with smoke and a yeast hint.  There is gentle ripeness, a modest coating of fat, and watering acidity that propels this unique wine.  This fresh wine sports good focus and is actually in need of age.  **** 2020-2028.

1997 Harrison Winery & Vineyards, Millenium Merlot 2000, Napa Valley – $10
Alcohol 14%.  A savory red wine with a rounded body and grippy, mouth filling finish.  It develops wood notes, an animale note, and even more rounded berries which mix with cinnamon, brown sugar. Quite tasty.  ***(*) Now – 2021.

A pair of Oregon Pinot Noir

If you are interested in Pinot Noir then I strongly recommend you try the 2016 Walter Scott, La Combe Verte, Pinot Noir, Willamette Valley.  It is best left to age for a year or two but if you are tempted now then give it a long decant.   It is a serious wine with deep flavor and sappy acidity all at a great price.  Stock up!  The 2014 Bryn Mawr Vineyards, Pinot Noir, Willamette Valley could use a touch of age as well, though I suspect it will always be closely played.  There is a certain old-school quality to it.  Thanks to Andy at MacArthur Beverages for the recommendations.

2016 Walter Scott, La Combe Verte, Pinot Noir, Willamette Valley – $26
Alcohol 13.6%.  Fine, ripe varietal aromas on the nose make way to fresh, yet weighty flavors and almost sappy acidity.  Blue fruit flavors develop over a moderately ripe structure with a hint of fresh greenness at the end.  Tasted over two days this young wine already has good depth but remains tight as it needs to develop for a year or two before you should drink it.  ***(*) 2020-2025.

2014 Bryn Mawr Vineyards, Pinot Noir, Willamette Valley – $22
This wine is 100% Pinot Noir aged 9 months in 30% new French oak.  Alcohol 13.3%.  A firm profile with slightly zippy, citric acidity mark this closely played wine with flavors of black cherry.  There is some spice, a stemmy nature, and an old-school herbal note.  **(*) 2019-2022.

I mistake Oregon Pinot Noir for Spatburgunder

Lou asked me to bring just one bottle to a blind Pinot Noir themed tasting.  The weather was temperate so we started off with 2009 Pichler-Krutzler, Gruner Veltliner, Frauengarten, Wachau while we moved our food, bottles, and glasses outside.  Made by the son-in-law and daughter of F. X. Pichler this bottle has killer aromas that alone warrant opening a bottle.  I guess Gruner can age!

All of the wines were brown bagged save the 1983 Prince Florent de Merode, Corton Clos du Roi.  The cork fell in when Lou stood it up so we tried it out of curiosity.  Proper bottles are probably good.

The first blind wine was certainly of an earlier generation.  Schug Winery was founded in 1980 by Walter Schug who was the founding winemaker at Phelps in the 1970s.  The 1981 Schug Cellars, Pinot Noir, Napa Valley is an early example of his efforts which will continue to last for many years thanks to the impressive structure.  It is a bit curious but still a respectable glass of wine.  Much younger and in complete contrast the 2002 Cameron, Clos Electrique offers impressive amounts of sweet, strawberry compote flavors.  This bottle is in peak shape and prime drinking.

In retrospect the 2007 Albert Morot, Beaune Toussaints 1er Cru is clearly French with its aromas.  There is a bit of everything but the linear personality restrains the pleasure.  The 2006 Antica Terra, Pinot Noir, Willamette Valley is in taller bottle but I mistook it for Austrian Spatburgunder due to the plentiful, bright fruit.  It continued to evolve, gaining complexity even on the second night.  Also from Oregon, the 2005 St. Innocent, Pinot Noir, Shea Vineyard, Willamette Valley is the youngest of all the wines we tasted.  It reminds me of an Oregon Pinot Noir, in my limited experience, and suggest you wait a bit longer in case it relaxes.

Thanks again to Lou for such a fun evening!

2009 Pichler-Krutzler, Gruner Veltliner, Frauengarten, Wachau
Imported by Weygandt-Metzler.  This is 100% Gruner Veltliner from 15-35 year old vines, fermented and aged on the lees in stainless steel.  Alcohol 12.5%.  The light golden color does not suggest the excellent nose full of textured aromas.  In the mouth there is a focused, almost crisp start with white fruit, chalk, and stones by the middle.  There is a nice amount of acidity in this mature wine.  With air it develops nutty flavors and sports a moderate amount of weight from nuts and fat.  ***(*) Now – 2020.

1983 Prince Florent de Merode, Corton Clos du Roi
Imported by Robert Haas.  The cork fell in when the bottle was stood up leaving a stinky nose but surprisingly round, sweet fruit in the mouth.  Not Rated.

A) 1981 Schug Cellars, Pinot Noir, Napa Valley
This smells mature with a hint of menthol.  In the mouth is up-front dense fruit flavors followed by a wintergreen freshness and perfumed aftertaste.  What is striking is the whopping structure of drying tannins which seems like a combination of stem inclusion and oak.  On the second night it remains firm with tangy red fruit and of course the structure.  ** Now-2027.

B) 2002 Cameron, Clos Electrique
Alcohol 13.3%.  The nose is quite mature.  In the mouth are quickly building flavors of sweet strawberry compote.  The quantity and quality of fruit is excellent and in great shape.  This is matched by juicy acidity and a little spicy hint in the softer finish.  Good bottle.  ***(*) Now – 2019.

2007 Albert Morot, Beaune Toussaints 1er Cru
Imported by Robert Kacher.  Alcohol 12%.  Some sweet aromas, oak, mushrooms, and a touch of earth.  With air there is a wood incense note.  The mouth reveals dark red fruit, watery acidity, and a tight core of black fruit leaving a linear impression.  It eventually sports some grip and a little cola and spice note.  It remains firm.  **(*) Now – 2023.

2) 2006 Antica Terra, Pinot Noir, Willamette Valley
Alcohol 14.4%.  The darker and younger looking in color.  The interesting, ample nose is very fresh and clean.  In the mouth are gobs of fruit flavors that slowly open to reveal ripe, complex flavors.  Substantial in a way but not heavy at all thanks to the brightness.  The acidity is perfectly balanced.  The flavors persist in the aftertaste.  **** Now – 2027.

3) 2005 St. Innocent, Pinot Noir, Shea Vineyard, Willamette Valley
Alcohol 14%.  This is a light grapey red color.  In the mouth are controlled flavors of ripe and perfumed black fruit.  Fine tannins develop by the finish as does a bitter, citrus note.  This tastes the youngest of all the wines and with extended air remains structured compared to the Antica Terra. *** Now – 2025.

A generous bottle of 2013 Sineann, Abondante, Columbia Valley

March 2, 2017 1 comment

I often spot the wines of Sineann in Seattle but until recently, never in Washington, DC.  The 2013 Sineann, Abondante, Columbia Valley is a Bordeaux blend with a dose of Zinfandel thrown in.  This is a forward, generous wine with a flavor profile you might find hard to place your finger on.  The Pacific Northwest can readily produce these hearty, juicy blends for everyday drinking.  Priced at $18 this is a good opportunity to try this Oregon producer’s non Pinot Noir wine.  It is available at MacArthur Beverages.

sinnean1

2013 Sineann, Abondante, Columbia Valley – $18
This wine is a blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Zinfandel, Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot, and Merlot.  Alcohol 14.8%.  This is a forward wine with an unusual fruit profile.  It is a little puckering with both black fruit and a mixture of ripe, powdery berries, only to become black fruited by the end.  It has fine grained tannins.  ** Now – 2020.

sinnean2

Wines with Thanksgiving Leftovers

November 28, 2016 Leave a comment

leftovers

Lou brought a trio of bottles over to go with Thanksgiving leftovers.  Coupled with a magnum of Bandol we tasted through some diverse wines.  The 1997 Argyle, Pinot Noir, Willamette Valley is from a moderate vintage and provides enough interest for a small glass.  The wine tastes as if the fruit were not quite ripe when picked.  Despite that criticism, the wine itself is chugging along and in no way decrepit.  From a much better vintage the 2001 Castello di Brolio, Chianti Classico looks significantly younger than its age.  It is full of color and dark red fruit delivered with some bright acidity.  While it is not particularly complex, it is in fine shape and made for solid drinking.  The magnum of 2007 Domaine de Terrebrune, Bandol proved to be my favorite wine of the night.  It is a touch soft at first then opens up to plenty of clean, maturing flavors with an attractive mineral streak.  It even seemed racy for a bit. There is no mistaking the 2013 Damiani Wine Cellars, Cabernet Franc, Finger Lakes for any other grape.  The aromas and flavors work in that lifted greenhouse or vegetal quality to good effect.  Actually, the wine is surprisingly packed with flavor.

1997 Argyle, Pinot Noir, Willamette Valley
Alcohol 13.5%.  More stemmy flavors the fruit at this point but the lifted fruit is still there in the form of bright, dry red fruit.  It tastes a bit short of ripe fruit.  With enough interest for a small glass it is more remarkable for holding up this long.  * Now.

2001 Castello di Brolio, Chianti Classico
Imported by Paterno Wines International.  Alcohol 13.5%.  Surprisingly dark but on closer inspection there is a garnet hint on the edge.  In the mouth are dark red fruit flavors, polished wood, and unfortunately a touch of heat in the end.  The flavors are dry with a generally bright outlook.  There is even some structure.  Overall this is a very solid wine that is simply not too complex.  ** Now – 2018.

2007 Domaine de Terrebrune, Bandol en magnum
Imported by Kermit Lynch.  This wine is a blend of 85% Mourvedre, 10% Grenache, and 5% Cinsault.  Alcohol 14%.  It is subtle for just a bit before the flavors accelerate through the mouth with a racy, mineral quality.  *** Now – 2018.

2013 Damiani Wine Cellars, Cabernet Franc, Finger Lakes
This wine is 100% Cabernet Franc. Alcohol 13.5%.  Fairly attractive nose of red and blue fruit marked by lifted greenhouse aromas.  The flavors bear the same vegetal hint but it works well with the fruit.  There is quite a bit of stuffing and freshness to make this enjoyable.  ** Now – 2017.