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Posts Tagged ‘HistoryOfWineImagesOctober2014’

The ideal capsule for a wine bottle from 1929

October 31, 2014 Leave a comment
Le Capsulage Ideal. 1929. [1]

Le Capsulage Ideal. 1929. [1]


[1] Revue des vins et liqueurs et des produits alimentaires pour l’exportation, Volume 54. 1929. Gallica Biblithoeque Numerique. URL: http://catalogue.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/cb410434488

An image from Bertall’s La Vigne (1878)

October 29, 2014 Leave a comment

Do not fear my lack of posting today, I am perfectly fine!  Last week I began accumulating some material for a simple post meant to reflect research as it happens.  But with each passing day I began to understand my subject better and I continue to find more information that only draws me in further.

From Bertall’s La Vigne. 1878. [1]


[1] Bertall. La vigne: voyage autour des vins de France. 1878. URL: http://books.google.com/books?id=8To3AQAAIAAJ&pg=PP1#v=onepage&q&f=false

A simple map showing effectiveness of the death treatment or use of carbon bisulphide against the phylloxera

October 28, 2014 Leave a comment

“[W]herever bisulphide reaches the habitation of the insect, sure death will follow…the application, however, should be judiciously made…applied otherwise, it is my opinion that the vine will receive a blow from which it will scarcely recover.”

The application of carbon bisulphide against phylloxera. [1]


[1] Reports of the Chief Viticultural Officer, Volume 1. 1882. URL: http://books.google.com/books?id=CfFNAAAAYAAJ&pg=PP1#v=onepage&q&f=false

Plan and pictures of the caves of Moet et Chandon circa 1896.

October 23, 2014 Leave a comment

Fig 1. Plan des caves basses. [1]

Fig 1. Plan des caves basses. [1]

Historic images related to Moet & Chandon have appeared in this blog before under the subject of the 1899 harvest description.  In this post I simply present a fantastic plan of the centuries old caves of Moet & Chandon.  I have spared description but from the plan I believe you may determine which sections are older and which are newer.  I have also included two images from the same period.  If you look close you may see how they were electrified.  I must admit, I wish the bottles in my basement continued along the wall as far as I could see.

Fig. 2. Vue d'une cave haute. [1]

Fig. 2. Vue d’une cave haute. [1]

Fig 4. Bouteilles entrayees et ouvrier en travail devant un pupitre. [1]

Fig 4. Bouteilles entrayees et ouvrier en travail devant un pupitre. [1]


[1] Ferrouillat and Charvet. Les Celliers Construction et Materiel Vinicole. 1896. Gallica, Bibliotheque Numerique.

A label from and two pictures of Fountain Grove Winery, Sonoma County

October 22, 2014 Leave a comment

1938 Fountain Grove, Riesling label. Yale University Library. [0]

1938 Fountain Grove, Riesling label. Yale University Library. [0]

Fountain Grove was established in 1875 by Thomas Lake Harris who founded the Brotherhood of the New Life.  He had already established three colonies in New York by 1861.  Fountain Grove was a Theo-Socialist community located on 700 acres just north of Santa Rosa in Sonoma County, California.   The community initially operated a dairy business but that failed within five years.  After planting vineyards and establishing a winery the community was producing 70,000 gallons of wine a year by 1886.  The community eventually failed in 1920 at which time Kanaye Nogasawa, one of the colonists, because sole owner of the winery.  He maintained the winery until it foundered in the 1930s.

Exterior, General View, Northwest Corner, Fountain Grove Winery. [1]

Exterior, General View, Northwest Corner, Fountain Grove Winery. [1]

Interior of vat, Fountain Grove Winery. [1]

Interior of vat, Fountain Grove Winery. [1]


[0] Fountaingrove. America and the Utopian Dream. Yale University Library. URL: http://brbl-archive.library.yale.edu/exhibitions/utopia/uc12d.html
[1] Fountain Grove Winery, Vat Buildings, Santa Rosa, Sonoma County, CA. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division. URL: http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/ca1243/

A vineyard by Vincent van Gogh

October 21, 2014 Leave a comment
Alter Weinberg mit Bäuerin.  Vincent van Gogh. 1890. [1]

Alter Weinberg mit Bäuerin. Vincent van Gogh. 1890. [1]


[1] Gogh, Vincent van. Alter Weinberg mit Bäuerin. 1890. Deutsches Dokumentationszentrum für Kunstgeschichte – Bildarchiv Foto Marburg. URL: https://www.deutsche-digitale-bibliothek.de/item/D3IS3ZXOLCUF65XZIJL3FJG456G2ADIU

Alcohol, Death, and the Devil. 1830s.

October 17, 2014 Leave a comment

George Cruikshank campaigned against alcohol according to the summary by the Library of Congress. This particularly vivid image shows a skeletal Medusa holding a glass of wine.  It was not until 1847 that George Cruikshank renounced alcohol in support of the Temperance Movement.  I can only imagine how macabre the image would have been if executed one decade later.

Alcohol, Death, and the Devil. Cruikshank, George. 1830-18490. [1]

Alcohol, Death, and the Devil. Cruikshank, George. 1830-18490. [1]


[1] [Alcohol, Death, and the Devil]. Cruikshank, George. 1830-1840.  Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division. URL: http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2003674027/

A fantastic image of men trodding grapes in Mexico during 1914-1918.

October 16, 2014 Leave a comment

This fantastic century old image shows the foot trodding of grapes in Mexico.  Nearly two dozen men are standing inside a giant concrete vat with grapes that come up to their thighs.  Two presses with screws are visible in the background.  It appears that music for encouragement and tempo was provided by the man with an accordion.

Pressing grapes in Mexico. 1914-1918. [1]

Pressing grapes in Mexico. 1914-1918. [1]


[1] Le pressoir à vin. Pressureurs debout dans le pressoir. 1914-1918. Reference #AP62T056305. Ministère de la culture (France), Médiathèque de l’architecture et du patrimoine, Diffusion RMN-GP. URL:

“le triomphe du vin sur son terrible ennemi”: A map detailing per capita liquor consumption in France for 1906

October 15, 2014 Leave a comment

The interesting chart in today’s image reveals the triumph in the cultivation of the vine against the increased per capita consumption of liquor in France during 1906.

Map detailing the per capita consumption of liquor with line indicating the limit of the cultivation of the vine. 1906. [1]

Map detailing the per capita consumption of liquor with line indicating the limit of the cultivation of the vine. 1906. [1]


[1] Guerre à l’alcool par l’impôt : étude statistique de l’effet des lois fiscales de 1897 et 1900 sur la consommation comparée de l’eau-de-vie et du vin. Bertillon, Jacques. 1912. Gallica Bibliotheque Numerique. URL: http://catalogue.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/cb318070686

French soldiers posing with their pinard during the Occupation of the Rhineland, 1919.

October 14, 2014 Leave a comment

I never really thought about the popularization of wine in France until Elizabeth Gabay MW pointed out the article Grande Guerre : quand le pinard était une arme pour la France.  According to wine historian Christophe Lucand wine was not regulated in the army until 1914.  Pinard refers to the ration of wine issued to French troops during World War 1.  Christophe Lucand writes that wine was popularized as a result of the pinard drunk in the trenches.  For a general background on pinard please read Rupert Millar’s piece from earlier this year WINE AND WARFARE PART 9: LE SALUT AU PINARD.  In keeping with the theme and sourcing from a rich selection of material this post features a picture of four French soldiers with their pinard.  Amongst them are four delicate wine glasses, three canteens, and two pipes.  The picture was taken in 1919 during the Occupation of the Rhineland.

 

"Souvenir du Palatinat. Les quatre as du pinard en vadrouille". 1919. [1]

“Souvenir du Palatinat. Les quatre as du pinard en vadrouille”. 1919. [1]


[1] Souvenir du Palatinat. 1919-02-08. ARCHIVES DEPARTEMENTALES DES YVELINES. URL: http://www.europeana.eu/portal/record/2020601/attachments_164731_15590_164731_original_164731_jpg.html?start=40&query=vin+guerre&startPage=25&rows=24