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Compelling wines from Savage Grace

October 14, 2014 Leave a comment

It seems to me that over the last several years the wine store scene has changed in Seattle.  There seems to have been a loss of enthusiasm in some of the stores.  This changed may have been signaled by the Whole Foods on 65th at Roosevelt Square opening up their walk-in wine cellar by removing the glass walls.   The inventory at Pete’s on East Lake seems to maintain more of the same stock with less peppering of unique wines.  Wine World and Spirits has a massive inventory of both but what good is all of the stock if no one has tasted the wine?  There are still interesting stores in Seattle and one of them is Pike & Western Wine Shop.  I personally think the selection here is even more diverse as of late.  Michael Teer is clearly excited and has done an excellent job of editing through everything that could be sold.

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I managed to see Michael during my recent trip to Seattle.  Michael has an unabashed love for Italian wine which means his Northwest selections tend to be rather interesting.  Of the few wines I purchased, Michael recommended the pair from Savage Grace Wines featured in today’s post.  I was quite taken by one of the wines such that I decided to move this post up in my ever-increasing queue.  Savage Grace Wines was only founded by Michael Savage in 2011.  His stated goal is to produce “lower-alcohol, balanced, and expressive wines”.   I do not select my wines based on alcohol level but I certainly appreciate lower-alcohol wines particularly when I feel like a bit of a drink.  Once  the 2013 Savage Grace Wines, Malbec, Dineen Vineyard, Rattlesnake Hills opened up, the only compelling choice was to see the bottle to the end.  Thus I appreciated the 12.8% alcohol.  This balanced wine was round, savory, had good acidity and tasted like nothing else.  A must try!  Just be sure to double-decant it for a few hours or wait until the temperatures drop below freezing.  The 2013 Savage Grace Wines, Cabernet Franc, Copeland Vineyard, Rattlesnake Hills was  clearly a Cabernet Franc wine.  It was a good wine but it remained a bit tight and not as exciting.  Perhaps I am unfair but then I hope you are reading this post because of my opinion. These wines were purchased as Pike & Western Wine Shop.

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2013 Savage Grace Wines, Malbec, Dineen Vineyard, Rattlesnake Hills – $25
This wine is 100% Malbec sourced from vines located around 1,000 feet in elevation.  The fruit was 70% whole cluster fermented then aged for a short period in neutral French oak.  Alcohol 12.8%.  The nose was aromatic with nice ripe, floral black fruit.  The mouth followed the nose becoming increasingly round and savory.  It had a little citrus then a mouth filling middle.  It reacted well to a few hours of air with the dark red fruit becoming a bit racy and round but balanced by the acidity on the tongue.  It reminded me of a Washington state wine and in an absolutely horrible comparison, had a uniqueness of flavor such as Boushey Syrah can provide.  ***(*) Now-2018.

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2013 Savage Grace Wines, Cabernet Franc, Copeland Vineyard, Rattlesnake Hills – $25
This wine is 100% Cabernet Franc sourced from vines located around 1,300 feet in elevation.  The fruit was destemmed, whole-berry fermented, then aged for seven months in neutral French oak barrels.  Alcohol 13.2%.  The nose revealed berries overlaying greenhouse aromas.  In the mouth were focused, round and tart fruit.  The flavors became savory with a sweet strawberry start.  There was acidity and a drier essence of flavors in the finish.  It remained compact over two days.  ** Now-2015.

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Tasting Wines from Edmunds St John, Fausse Piste, Linden, Sandlands, and Two Shepherds

Lou texted me that he tried one of the wines he received in the inaugural shipment from Sandlands Vineyards.  It was special.  Sandlands Vineyards is the project of Tegan and Olivia Passalacqua.  Tegan has been making wine at Turley Wine Cellars for some time.  These Sandlands wines are made with fruit from old, head-trained and dry-farmed vines in California.  Lou mentioned he had a bottle of the Trousseau Noir so I knew I had to acquire a bottle of William Allen’s Two Shepherds Trousseau Gris.  We then added in wines of  Fausse Piste from Washington, Linden Vineyards from Virginia, and Edmunds St John from California.  Our tasting was born.

I will keep this brief by just posting my thoughts.  The wines of Sandlands are indeed special and exciting.  You must get on the waiting list right away!  I am digging Trousseau Gris and Trousseau Noir from California.  Those in Washington, DC, are fortunate that you can buy the Two Shepherds wines at Weygandt Wines.  Ask Tim  or Warren if there is any Trousseau Gris left because William Allen has no more of the 2012 vintage.  While you are at the shop pick up the Edmunds St John, Rocks + Gravel.  You will be strongly satisfied drinking it now but be sure to cellar some as well.  Over the years I have felt there was a certain funk or lurking flavor that I did not like in the red wines of Virginia.  The Linden, Claret moves beyond that and lives up to the classic Claret name.  Thanks to Phil at MacArthur Beverages for putting this in my sights.

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2012 Two Shepherds, Trousseau Gris, Fanucchi Vineyard, Russian River Valley
This wine is 100% Trousseau Gris.  Alcohol 13.8%.  The color was of a bright copper kettle.  The nose was beautiful with ripe, floral aromas.  In the mouth the round flavors became racy in the middle then took on dry red flavors with integrated acidity.  The flavors were well supported becoming ripe and gentle in the finish.  On the second night there was a lovely, dense body to this unique wine.  ***(*) Now-2017.

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2013 Fausse Piste, Garde Mange, Columbia Valley
This wine is 100% Syrah. Alcohol 14.1%.  This began with raisin-like, savory flavors, integrated acidity, and structure in the finish.  It even had a little thickness.  On the second night this showed better balance with bramble, some herbs black fruit, and ruggedness. ** Now-2017.

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2012 Sandlands Vineyards, Trousseau, Sonoma County
This wine is 100% Trousseau Noir.  Alcohol 13.2%.  The color was a light garnet.  The nose was aromatic with vintage perfume and aromas familiar to the Trousseau Gris.  In the mouth were serious flavors.  The structure was there and matched the flavors in the finish.  It was a little salty, expansive, and beautiful.  It took on a little tart fruit.  The acidity was lovely, crisp and matched the eventually tangy flavors.  **** Now-2019.

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2012 Edmunds St John, Rocks + Gravel, Dry Creek Valley, Sonoma County
This wine is a blend of 55% Grenache, 27% Syrah, and 18% Mourvedre.  Alcohol ?  The nose had some enjoyable funk with red fruit but remained tight.  There were lively flavors of ripe, mixed berries that picked up intensity.  It continued to drink like a brighter Rhone-styled wine.  *** Now-2025.

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2011 Linden, Claret
This wine is a blend of 44% Merlot, 36% Cabernet Sauvignon, and 20% Cabernet Franc.  Alcohol 13.2%.  The nose revealed dried herb and wood overlaying bright fruit and some meat.  The flavors followed the nose with bright acidity, ripe tannins, and some Big Red notes.  This was a youthful wine with young tasting fruit.  It became a little herbacious with black graphite, and spicy, drying tannins that coated the mouth.  With air this showed dry flavors of bright fruit.  **(*) 2015-2019.

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2010 Sandlands Vineyards, Mataro
This wine is 100% Mataro.  Alcohol 13.6%.  The nose remained right.  In the mouth there was more fruit than the Trousseau Noir along with an interesting note of polished old wood.  In a sense it was similar to the Trousseau Noir in profile.  There were enjoyable dense aromas, a little savory flavor, black fruit, attractive graphite, and old-wood notes.  Needs cellar time.  Lou reported this was great on the third night.  ***(*) 2016-2026.

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Quilceda Creek

I have now drunk three bottles of Quilceda Creek from two vintages.  The most recent bottle of 2007 Quilceda Creek Vintners, Red Wine, Columbia Valley proved powerful.  The flavors were good but the bits of heat breaking out were distracting.  I shall hold onto my final bottle for several more years.  The second experiences was with Lou who opened the 2007 Quilceda Creek Vintners, Red Wine, Columbia Valley back in August of 2011.  This bottle was also young but the fruit held up to the structure and heat.  The first experience dates back 21 years when Mark Savage MW tutored an Oregon and Washington State tasting for the Bristol University Wine Circle.    My tasting note for the 1985 Quilceda Creek, Cabernet Sauvignon reads ,”Deep dark color.  Really dry, extremely tannic.  Last vintage made so tannic.  This one has too much tannin.”  I had forgotten I drunk this wine until I wrote about my drinking experiences at Bristol University.  I suggest you read my post Oregon And Washington Tasting, Mark Savage MW, 16th Feb 1993 for there are some hilarious notes!

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2007 Quilceda Creek Vintners, Red Wine, Columbia Valley –
This wine is a blend of 72% Cabernet Sauvignon, 20% Merlot, 6% Cabernet Franc, and 2% Malbec.  Alcohol 15.2%.  The nose was a little meaty. In the mouth were dense, inky fruit then minerals and spicy structure as well as some heat.  The structure was strong but the flavors spread low and expanded rapidly in the finish.  With air the fruit developed some sweetness before the refreshing aftertaste.  The structure and heat were a little distracting at this point, cellar further.  *** 2017-2027.

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Recent Drinks Including An Attractive Greek Wine Made from Mavro Kalavritino

These are several solid wines in this post that deliver regional character at an affordable price.  Of those still available I would recommend the 2012 Domaine Roger Perrin, Cotes du Rhone and the 2012 Celler de Capcanes, Mas Donis Barrica, Old Vines, Montsant.  Chances are you have seen this pair of wines before so I want to bring the 2012 Tetramythos Wines, Mavro Kalavritino, Achaia to your attention.  Tetramythos is a young winery having produced their first wine in 1999 and completed the winery in 2004.  I had never tried a wine made from Mavro Kalavritino nor from the Achaia region so I was excited to find I enjoyed this wine.  I was particularly attracted to evocations of wild scrubland herbs in the aromas and the flavors.  I recommend you try this wine and there really is no excuse not to, it is afterall, only $11.  These wines were purchased at MacArthur Beverages.

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2009 Andre Brunel, Cuvee Sabrine, Cotes du Rhone Villages – $13
Imported by Robert Kacher Selections.  This wine is a blend of mostly Grenache with some Syrah and Mourvedre.  Alcohol 14%.  The nose bore some blackberry aromas.  In the mouth were somewhat compact black fruit flavors, gentle spices, and fresh fruit acidity.  It became more robust in the middle with fine tannins in the finish and a dry aftertaste.  It opened up with air to show some roundness, a touch of earthy flavors complemented by garrigue, wood, and leather.  **(*) 2015-2022.

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2012 Celler de Capcanes, Mas Donis Barrica, Old Vines, Montsant – $12
Imported by Eric Solomon European Cellars.  Alcohol 14%.  There were dense fruit aromas on the nose.  In the mouth were dense flavors that leaned towards the red spectrum before becoming black and dry.  With air the earthiness reduced but it did show some complexity with a little cherry note in the finish.  There was some extract, a little salivating acidity.  A solid wine.  ** Now-2018.

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2008 Mercer Estates, Merlot, Columbia Valley – $18
The nose was a modern blend of fruit and chocolate.  In the mouth were flavors of controlled ripe fruit, chocolate powder, and hints of both greenhouse and spiciness.  There were fine, ripe, powdery tannins and some acidity.  This wine had decent flavors for the profile and should remain at this plateau for years.  ** Now-2018.

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2012 Domaine Roger Perrin, Cotes du Rhone – $13
Imported by Potomac Selections.  Alcohol 13%.  The dark red aromas and macerated berries made way to mixed flavors of red and blue fruit.  The fruit tastes young.  The wine had some minerals, good acidity, and moderate structure which was left on the gums.  It had  a bit of everything but remained a little tight over two nights.  I would wait a few more months before drinking. ** Now-2018.

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2012 Tetramythos Wines, Mavro Kalavritino, Achaia – $11
Imported by Dionysos Imports.  Alcohol 13%.  The attractive nose smelled of scrubland and became a little sweaty.  In the mouth were dark red fruit flavors.  This was a lighter wine with a dry flavors before a gentle, textured ripeness.  There were flavors of wild herbs that mixed with a sense of maturity and watering acidity before the dry finish.  This solid wine took up plum and cocoa flavors in the persistent aftertaste.  ** Now-2015.

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2011 Valley Vintners, Trianguli, Bouquet, Danubian Plain – $19
Imported by Parallel 43 Selection.  This is made from 100% Bouquet which is a crossing between Mavrud and Pinot Noir.  Alcohol 13%.  The  nose bore dark fruit and tightened up with air.  In the mouth were modern, black fruit flavors, a hint of black tea, and a citric note in the finish.  This is a solid wine that should be aged for several months before trying.  *(*) 2014-2018.

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Bottles of Miner, Neyers, and K Vintners for the 4th of July Weekend

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We continued our tradition of drinking American wines over the long 4th of July holiday weekend.  The 2013 Miner Family Wines, Rosato, Mendocino proved to be an outright tasty wine.  While some might be excited that it is made from Sangiovese, our group preferred the flavor for our bottle was promptly finish.  Our experience with Neyers Vineyards continues to reveal attractive, well-priced wines.  The 2011 Neyers Vineyards, Zinfandel, Del Barba Vineyard, Contra Costa County was enjoyed by all.  It captures the juicy, berry nature of Zinfandel in a generous yet crisp manner.  There is good complexity right now so why wait?  Bottles of 2011 K Vintners, Syrah, Milbrandt, Wahluke Slope, Columbia Valley should be left in the cellar.  It is true that the flavors have no hard edges at all but the new oak flavors need time to integrate. The Miner and Neyers are available at MacArthur Beverages and the K Vintners at The Cheese Shop in Williamsburg.

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2013 Miner Family Wines, Rosato, Mendocino – $20
This wine is produced using the saignée method with 100% Sangiovese.  Alcohol 14.1%.  The color was a vivid red rose.  This fruit wine had red fruit followed by minerally black fruit.  There was a lot of acidity as well as a textured, ripe finish.  This flavorful, crisp wine was evocative of hard cherries.  Nice.  *** Now.

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2011 Neyers Vineyards, Zinfandel, Del Barba Vineyard, Contra Costa County – $24
This wine is 100% Zinfandel that was aged in used French oak.  Alcohol 14.6%.  The ripeness was immediately apparent with flavors of blue and red fruit mixed with baking spices.  There was some extract in this juicy wine that took on a lot of berry cobbler flavor.  Though the wine was fairly rich and weighty it maintained freshness.  Drinking well right now.  *** Now.

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2011 K Vintners, Syrah, Milbrandt, Wahluke Slope, Columbia Valley – $35
This wine is 100% Syrah sourced from the Sundance and Northridge vineyards that was aged for 11 months in 25%new French oak barrels.  Alcohol 14%.  There were round flavors of red and black fruit, and a hint of cocoa.  The wine was almost creamy with no harsh edges before the mineral hint in the finish.  The fruit remained clean with an almost refreshing, cool aftertaste.  I would cellar this further because the barrel flavors need further time to integrate. **(*) 2016-2024.

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Drinks in Seattle

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There is a cycle of demolition and construction which has persisted across the recession in Seattle.  It is both fascinating to watch both across and within my visits.  I must admit it is one aspect I look forward to when I fly out.   Amongst the wines I tasted one year ago on the 33rd floor of my hotel were the 2011 Owen Roe, Sinister Hand and 2010 Gifford Hirlinger, Stateline Red.  Strangely enough I tasted the opposite vintages during my most recent trip.  The 2010 Owen Row, Sinister Hand, Columbia Valley is starting to open up to reveal a very satisfying wine which is gaining complexity.  It should drink well for several years so I definitely recommend you grab several bottles.  The 2011 Gifford Hirlinger, Stateline Red, Columbia Valley loses the Tempranillo and Petit Verdot from the previous vintage but gains Syrah.  There is no doubt that at $13 you get a ton of wine for the price.  It drank best on the first night when it was mouthfilling and hedonistic rather than the second night when heat was breaking through.  It is honestly too much for me but that is perhaps better than too little at this price point.  Finally, the 2010 Domaine Grand Guilhem, Fitou was a lighter but serious wine.  I remember drinking Fitou during my Bristol days because it was rather inexpensive but still had character.  The Sinister Hand was purchased at Whole Foods, the Gifford Hirlinger was purchased at Pete’s Wine of Eastlake, and the Grand Guilhen was purchased at Bar Ferd’nand.

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2010 Owen Row, Sinister Hand, Columbia Valley – $25
This wine is a blend of 71% Grenache, 24% Syrah, and 5% Mourvedre.  Alcohol 14.3%.  This had a fresh nose of fruit and lemony citrus.  The flavors were slightly tight with a tannic start.  The red and orange fruit flavors morphed into more black flavor mixed with spices and a savory end.  The structure was there but the tannins were not really noticeable  until the finish.  The was followed by an orange hint in the aftertaste.  Best on the second night.  *** Now-2019.

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2011 Gifford Hirlinger, Stateline Red, Columbia Valley – $13
This wine is a blend of 45% Cabernet Sauvignon, 40$ Merlot, and 15% Syrah which was aged for 18 months in 30% new American oak barrels.  Alcohol 14.9%.  There was a lot of robust, forward fruit that was black and mouth filling.  It had moderate weight then salty power in the finish.  On the second day noticeable heat came out in the aftertaste.  It was smooth on the outside with a sense of roughness and mouth-filling power but the heat was distracting.  ** Now.

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2010 Domaine Grand Guilhem, Fitou – $22
Imported by Barrique Imports.  This wine is a blend of Carignan, Grenache, Syrah, and Mourvedre.  Alcohol 13.5%.  This was a little stinky at first then black fruit aromas came out.  In the mouth were brighter and lighter black fruit flavors.  It was a touch juicy with a little tang near the start.  The tannins played out near the end dressing the wine up with a little bit of structure.  It was lighter and youthful but in a serious way.  ** Now-2016.

Wine in Small Servings: From Unpleasant Reactions to Red and Black Fruit

April 1, 2014 4 comments

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I travel with some consistency.  In my desire to have a few glasses of wine in my hotel room I inevitably do not finish the bottle I have purchased and dump the remains down the sink.  That is a waste which could be eliminated by drinking from single-serve bottles.  While it is in my nature to travel with a corkscrew, others may not, particularly if you fly carry-on.  In this post we investigated small servings of wine which do not require a corkscrew to open.  These are suitable not only for travel but other occasions including lunch in one’s cubicle, a picnic, or perhaps the long train ride home.  There is a certain tongue-in-cheek nature to the idea of this post, given the timing of this first day of April, but one thing which is true is that my most viewed post remains I Try Cups of Copa Di Vino.  Back in January almost 1,000 individuals read this post within 24 hours.

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The wines featured in this post come from a variety of sources including Giant in Manassas, Sheetz gas station in Morgantown (thanks John!), and Whole Foods in downtown Seattle.  The per bottle price ranges from $6.29 for NV Sutter Home, Cabernet Sauvignon, California to a whopping $20.18 for the NV oneglass Wine, Cabernet Savuignon, Delle Venezie, Italy.  The last time I recall drinking a single serve bottle of wine was on an Alaska Airlines flight where I featured the 2009 Sutter Home, Merlot, California in my post Tasting Wine at 34,000 Feet….Live!

Of the wines tasted the 2011 Bota Box, Chardonnay, California ranks as the worst wine I have ever drunk in my life.  It literally made me want to puke and like sticking your fingers down your throat, it was repeatable.  If it acceptable to find Copa di Vino at a gas station then  it is unacceptable that Whole Foods was selling the NV oneglass Wine, Cabernet Sauvignon, Delle Venezie, Italy.   Beyond the $20 per bottle equivalent sales price, marked down from $22.50, the wine was off-putting.  I simply cannot imagine how it ended up on their shelves.  One thing that might be telling, there were just a handful of these containers left as compared to my previous visit.  Of all the wines tasted the 2012 Woodbridge, Cabernet Sauvignon, California was the best.  It smelled and tasted like wine and at $6.74 per 4-pack it was all that I expected.  It comes with a handy carrying case.  If you do not mind dumping some wine down the sick then you are better off buying by the screw-capped bottle.

WHITE WINES

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The best of the dry whites was the NV Vendange, Chardonnay, Australia.  Rather mellow for my tastes it could be thought of as a mature box wine!  The best and only off-dry white was the Copa di Vino, Riesling, Columbia Valley.  This was in fact the best of the Copa di Vino wines we tried for it did not purport to be anything else.

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Copa di Vino, Chardonnay, Columbia Valley – $2.69 (187 mL)
Use by 07-29-14.  Alcohol 13.2%.  The color was a very light straw.  The very light nose had a little oak influences, yellow fruit, and stink notes.  In the mouth were lean, acidity driven flavors which became puckering with a lot of acidity by the aftertaste.  It was watering with a metallic note and the stink persisting in the mouth.  On the second night it was still funky and stinky. Poor.

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2012 Woodbridge, Chardonnay, California – $6.74 (4-pack of 187mL)
Alcohol 13.5%.  The color was a light yellow green.  The nose had fresher yellow fruit which turned tropical.  There was very acidity driven fruit, a roundish feel, and acidity on the tongue tip.  It had a creamsicle flavor and a metallic finish.  There was some grip in the aftertaste.  On the second night it was very similar but with more tropical notes.  Drinkable. * Now.

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NV Vendange, Chardonnay, Australia – $4.94 (500 mL)
Alcohol 12.5%.  The color was a very light straw.  The light nose had slightly richer yellow fruit.  In the mouth were lower lying flavor, much less comparable acidity.  As a whole more mellow but with some balance.  It had some toast in the apple-like finish and became more balanced with air.  There was even some aftertaste.  Tropical notes develop for which it needs more acidity.  Drinkable. * Now.

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2011 Bota Box, Chardonnay, California – $6.29 (500 mL)
Alcohol 13%.  The color was a light golden yellow.  The nose bore mature pineapple pieces.  In the mouth this dense tasting wine was mouth filling with supporting acidity and non-descript flavors.  Odd.  There was a metallic finish.  Strange enough, there was an odd reaction in the back of my throat…this wine made me want to puke.  Poor.

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Copa di Vino, Riesling, Columbia Valley – $2.69 (187 mL)
Freshest by 08-12-14.  Alcohol 12.2%.  The nose smelled like sweet wine.  In the mouth was a sweet entry with supporting acidity and a little texture on the tongue tip.  It had tropical white and yellow fruit flavors.  There was a short finish.  * Now.

 

RED WINES

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The red wines generally left the impression of either being heavily manufactured or made from the discarded remnant of bad wine.  The NV Barefoot, Merlot, California might have fans because it is intentionally slightly off-dry but it did pass the threshold of being drinkable wine.  Just a few tens of cents more the 2012 Woodbridge, Cabernet Sauvignon, California was the hands down favorite of all of the wines tasted.  Perhaps it was the vintage date or the $0.45 premium over the NV Sutter Home, Cabernet Sauvignon, California that account for higher-quality fruit.

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2012 JT Wines, FLASQ wine, Merlot, California – $7 (375 mL)
Alcohol 13.5%.  This had red fruit on the nose with a hint of greenhouse aromas.  In the mouth the red fruit had some ripeness, a greenhouse note, and a hint of jammy sweetness.  The tannins were pleasing.  It did have an odd under-note and feeling of confection.  Would rate higher but for the oddity.   Poor.

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NV Barefoot, Merlot, California – $6.74 (4-pack of 187mL)
Alcohol 13%.  The color was a medium ruby grape.  There was sweet blue fruit on the nose.  In the mouth was a round start with ripe fruit that had grip and was balanced with acidity.  It had a creamy blueberry finish with good texture.  Perhaps too much residual sugar for my preference.  * Now.

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NV Sutter Home, Cabernet Sauvignon, California – $6.29 (4-pack of 187mL)
Alcohol 13%.  The color was a light to medium ruby.  It had a cleaner fruit nose.  In the mouth were leaner black and red fruit, subtle structure, a little appropriate greenhouse flavor, and some candied notes.  * Now.

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2012 Woodbridge, Cabernet Sauvignon, California – $6.74 (4-pack of 187mL)
Alcohol 13.5%.  This had a subtle nose.  In the mouth were ripe but controlled red and black fruit, plenty of integrated acidity, some spice, a little chewy finish, and structure towards the end.  This tasted like proper wine and was hands-down the best.  * Now.

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Copa di Vino, Merlot, Chile – $2.69 (187 mL)
Use by 02-08-15.  Alcohol 13%.  There was a sweet nose of sweet floral aromas.  In the mouth this wind revealed round, soft, rather perfumed sweet fruit.  It was very round with creamy fruit, some herbaceousness, and a downright odd profile.  Poor.

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Copa di Vino, Cabernet Sauvignon, Chile – $2.69 (187 mL)
Use by 05-07-15.  Alcohol 13.3%.  This had a better nose of black fruit and greenhouse aromas.  In the mouth the herbaceous black fruit had a grapefruit note with integrated acidity and tannins.  There was texture in the finish and a surprising amount of tannins.  Tasted manufactured but drinkable.  * Now.

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NV oneglass Wine, Cabernet Sauvignon, Delle Venezie, Italy – $2.69 (100 mL)
Alcohol 13%.  There was a bizarre and off-putting nose.  The mouth had round, cherry fruit which tasted old in a way.  There was old perfume, acidity, ripe tannins, and downright odd flavors.  Poor.

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