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The must-try 2017 Julien Sunier, Regnie

October 15, 2018 Leave a comment

You must try the 2017 Julien Sunier, Regnie.  It is a lovely blend of exotic florals, black fruit with minerals, and ethereal ripeness, all of which is capable of additional development over the next several years.  If you try a bottle today you can observe it unfold over several hours.  Pick it up at MacArthur Beverages.

 

2017 Julien Sunier, Regnie – $32
Imported by Williams Corner Wines.  This wine is 100% Gamay sourced from vines averaging 60 years of age.  The fruit was fermented with indigenous yeast in concrete vats then aged for 9 months in French barrels.  Alcohol 13%.  This wine slowly opens up, requiring a few hours of air to reveal itself.  There is fresh acidity with modest fruit, modest acidity, and a graphite middle.  With air the very focused flavors of exotic florals and perfume take on a cool density with crisp acidity.  Watering flavors of cranberry and black fruit remain focused but an oily and ethereal ripeness develop.  It wraps up black-fruited and mineral.  ***(*) Now – 2028.

A pair of 2017 Beaujolais

September 11, 2018 Leave a comment

I grabbed a pair of 2017 Beaujolais off the shelves at MacArthur Beverages this past weekend.  These two wines are more in line with the 2016 vintage than the 2015 but even then, are ultimately more grapey and brighter in flavor.  In this light, the 2017 Kermit Lynch (Domaine Dupeuble), Beaujolais will offer plenty of flavor to be drunk over the next year or two.  Hail hit Beaujolais for another year in a row during the 2017 vintage.  The 2017 Marcel Lapierre, Beaujolais contains no fruit from the Côte du Puy which I cannot help but believe shaped this wine.  The 2016 vintage was crisp and energetic from the start, making a good drink upon release.  This 2017 vintage is firm, with good material, leaving the impression that it will drink better next year.  I will try it again this winter.

2017 Kermit Lynch (Domaine Dupeuble), Beaujolais – $14
Imported by Kermit Lynch.  Alcohol 13.5%.  Good floral and firm, grapey fruit.  There is some texture, crisp and watering acidity, with some baking spice flavor in the end.  Grapey, young, not too deep, but with a good amount of flavor. **(*) Now – 2019.

2017 Marcel Lapierre, Beaujolais – $30
Imported by Kermit Lynch.  Alcohol 13.5%.  Tart red fruit defines itself as cranberry and raspberry with supportive acidity and some firmness with fine structure.  It should develop over the rather short-term.  This is a fruity wine to start, pure in flavor, becoming more firm and dry with air.  It tastes like Beaujolais and not the Rhone.  It becomes almost grapey with powdery flavor.  ***(*) Now – 2025.

A mixture of wines young and old

I met up with Lou and another friend for a casual after-work tasting of wines.  We started with a pair of bottles from the Finger Lakes of New York.  I have now enjoyed the 2016 Red Tail Ridge Winery, Sparkling Riesling Petillant Naturel, Finger Lakes on three different occasions.  This bottle was particularly frothy with a core of fruit and vein of bubbles that make it delicious to drink right now.  Also made from Riesling, but smelling like there is Sauvignon Blanc as well, is the 2016 Heart & Hands, Dry Riesling, Finger Lakes.  It is a solid wine of tart citrus and chalk flavor.

The pair of 2014 White Burgundy yielded a generous, rapidly maturing 2014 Gautier Thevenet, Domaine Emilian Gillet, Quintaine, Vire-Clesse.  Of good value I would say.  In comparison, the 2014 Jean-Marc Pillot, Chassagne-Montrachet is less fruity and the better wine.  With a core of lemon and ripe apple, there is an acidic spine, all of which lasts with good length.

Made from the youngest vines, 2017 Pierre-Marie Chermette, Griottes, Beaujolais is a well-made, enjoyable, grapey wine.  It is pure, fresh, and acted as our gateway to a trio of mystery wines.

I admit to being confused.  I had settled in on the wines being from the 1960s and 1970s, with origins in Italy or California, and at least one Cabernet Sauvignon.  Mystery #1 – 1974 Croce di Fralupaia, Chianti was younger than I thought but not worth drinking.  Mystery #2 – 1991 Tenuta Caparzo, Brunello di Montalcino was also younger than I thought but sound, which gives you an ideal of its maturity curve.  With air it took on body and flavor to become rather enjoyable.  The final bottle is the modest Mystery #3 – 1984 Steltzner Vineyards, Cabernet Sauvignon, Napa Valley.

2016 Red Tail Ridge Winery, Sparkling Riesling Petillant Naturel, Finger Lakes
Alcohol 13%.  Very frothy at first but the body soon develops.  There is a focused fruit core with the fine bubble vein.  With air and warmth the Riesling origins come out.  Easy to drink.  *** Now – 2020.

2016 Heart & Hands, Dry Riesling, Finger Lakes
Alcohol 11.5%.  A very light straw color.  A good nose, aromatic with both grassy and petrol aromas.  A soft frame exists for the whole fruit Riesling flavor.  There is some chalk and a slightly, tart citrus flavor in the end.  The acidity is balanced by the sugar such that it does not come across as lively.  Some engaging grip develops.  ** Now.

2014 Gautier Thevenet, Domaine Emilian Gillet, Quintaine, Vire-Clesse
Imported by Simon N Cellars. Alcohol 14%.  A very light yellow.  A rounded edge with with ripe lemon flavors, stones in the middle, and some fat in the finish.  It is easy to drink and will mature rapidly.  **(*) Now – 2020.

2014 Jean-Marc Pillot, Chassagne-Montrachet
Alcohol 13%.  A very light green yellow color.  There is a focused fruit impression at first but this wine is not all about the fruit.  It is dense and focused with a good, acidic spine.  There are hints of yeast and wood.  With air the flavors settle on lemon with a ripe, apple core.  Good length.  *** Now – 2023.

2017 Pierre-Marie Chermette, Griottes, Beaujolais
Imported by Weygandt-Metzler. Alcohol 12.5%.  A purple, red cranberry color.  Grapey and bright on the nose.  The flavors are evocative of young, grape juicy being light, very pure, and fresh.  Tart berries and grip are closed by a round, verve finish.  ** Now.

Mystery #1 – 1974 Croce di Fralupaia, Chianti
Imported by T. Elenteny. Alcohol 12%.  Past prime on the nose with a banana aroma.  In the mouth it is falling apart with some leather, animale, and a hint of freshness.  There is a touch of fat-edged flavor and body but it soon turns acidic with green apple flavors.  Past prime.  Not Rated.

Mystery #2 – 1991 Tenuta Caparzo, Brunello di Montalcino
Imported by Palace Brands. Alcohol 13%. A garnet, brick color.  It tasted quite mature at first with bottle aged flavors, citric acidity, and citric pithe on the gums.  But magically, with air, it develops both body and flavor.  It even takes on a luxurious, marshmallow mouth feel.  *** Now.

Mystery #3 – 1984 Steltzner Vineyards, Cabernet Sauvignon, Napa Valley
Earthy fruit with red cranberry flavors, a grippy nature, and clearly the most acidic of all the wines tasted.  Vibrant but a bit thin in flavor with a slight green edge.  ** Now.

A pair from Brouilly

My daughter’s Monday evening soccer practice is conveniently located near Weygandt Wines.  It is here that I picked up the bright and pure 2016 Pierre-Marie Chermette, Pierreux, Brouilly.  It acts as a good foil for the 2016 Daniel Bouland, Cuvee Melanie, Cotes de Brouilly.  While the Bouland has a bit more heft it also offers more complexity in an understated way.

2016 Pierre-Marie Chermette, Pierreux, Brouilly – $25
Imported by Weygandt-Metzler.  This wine is 100% Gamay from 30 year old vinces on granitic scree.  Alcohol 13%.  There are tangy berries followed by an interesting cranberry and raspberry middle.  This wine is about pure fruit flavors.  It also has a bright tilt.  *** Now – 2020.

2016 Daniel Bouland, Cuvee Melanie, Cotes de Brouilly – $26
Imported by Weygandt-Metzler.  This wine is 100% Gamay sourced from 70 year old vines on volcanic blue schist.  Alcohol 13%.  An herbal hint on the nose is not repeated in the mouth.  Flavors of focused fruit are supported by a fine structure from the start.  The cool and tangy red and black fruit has good, moderate weight which pairs with the juicy acidity.  The wine becomes a touch drier in the finish.  This has an understated complexity to it.  ***(*) Now – 2023.

You may age the aromatic 2016 Jean-Marc Burgaud, Morgon Cote du Py

The 2016 Jean-Marc Burgaud, Morgon Cote du Py is a fine wine to drink into the next decade.  This crisp wine is young and structured but the nose is wonderfully aromatic.  A must try for fans of Morgon.  I recommend you lay down a few bottles which you may find at MacArthur Beverages.

2016 Jean-Marc Burgaud, Morgon Cote du Py – low $20s
Imported by Roanoke Valley Wine Co.  This wine is 100% Gamay sourced from 50 year old vines on blue stone soils matured in concrete vats.  Alcohol 13%.  Tasted over two nights this remains a very aromatic and enticing wine with aromas of pepper, wet tobacco, and herbs.  The flavors are crisp and focused but the cranberry red fruit is weighty.  There is firm acidity, a dry structure, and almost tart finish which suggest this will be long-lived.  *** Now – 2025.

2016 Julienas and Morgon from Lapierre

In 2016, hail damaged more than 7 acres of Lapierre family vines, prompting the purchase of fruit from nearby Julienas.  I tasted this one-off cuvee with its brother from Morgon over two nights.  That the same hand made the wine is evident so the comparison between the two wines is fun.  The Morgon has a bit more stuffing being meatier with more tannins.  The Julienas is higher-toned, more floral and elegant.  In this context I found the Morgon to be a touch more satisfying.  But then I first drank the Julienas with an old friend at Buvette, it was exactly what I craved after a day of travel.   These wines are available at MacArthur Beverages.

2016 Lapierre, Morgon – $30
Imported by Kermit Lynch.  This wine is 100% Gamay sourced from 60 year old vines on granitic gravel soils.  Alcohol 13%.  The nose is articulate with ripe aromas.  There is a ripe, bright core of red fruit and minerals with a drier finish.  Both citric acidity and pithe-like tannins come out in the aftertaste.  Enjoyably meaty with good acidity.  ***(*) Now – 2023.

2016 Lapierre, Julienas – $35
Imported by Kermit Lynch.  This wine is 100% Gamay sourced from 60 year old vines on volcanic and schist soils.  Alcohol 13.5%.  The nose is relatively brighter and higher-toned.  The high-tone echoes on the start with citric red fruit and zippy acidity yet the wine has attractive fat.  It is floral and fruitier with spices in the watering finish.  With air a floral, sweet black tea note comes out.  ***(*) Now – 2022.

Gamay for Thanksgiving

November 24, 2017 Leave a comment

For Thanksgiving this year I served six different bottles of Gamay all of which are currently available for purchase.  The 2015 La Dernière Goutte, Sang Neuf is the first wine I had everyone taste.  I must admit I was very curious to try this wine because it is imported by Jeffrey Snow of Glou Glou Wines.  Some of you may know Jeff from his days as a wine distributor in the Washington, DC, area.  A few years ago he moved to France for university which precipitated, based on the stream of vineyard and open bottle pictures I saw, some serious research.  Jeff is back in the area importing the wines he loves to drink in France. This first bottle I have tried of his is produced by Cyrille Vuillod who farms vines in St-Etienne la Varenne.  Vuillod does not add anything to his wine including sulphur dioxide.  They are bottled with the natural carbon dioxide as a preservative so there is spritz even after double-decanting.  Jeff writes of freshness and now I understand!  The 2015 vintage was very warm in Beaujolais but Vuillod’s wines, which normally achieve 11%-12% alcohol, came in at 13%.  The wine is surprisingly deep at first but with air the flavors become tart carried by some killer, crunchy acidity.  The wine is stable too.  Grab a bottle if you want to learn what freshness is all about!

As for the other bottles I served, the 2015 Guillaume Gilles, Les Massardieres confirms once again that it is an awesome bottle of wine.  The 2015 Jean-Paul Brun, Moulin a Vent Terres Dorees remained rather focused and tight all day.  It did develop an attractive, creamy finish but this wine is best cellared for a few years.  The 2015 Jean Foillard, Morgon Cote du Py certainly has strong potential.  Buy a few bottles for your cellar.  Of the 2016 and 2015 Lapierre, Morgon I preferred the 2016.  I really enjoy the sweaty, earthy components of the 2015 but it felt, in comparison, weighed down as the 2016 is crisp and vigorous.  All of these wines are available at MacArthur Beverages.

2015 La Dernière Goutte, Sang Neuf – $26
Imported by Glou Glou Wines.  Alcohol 13%.  A slight spritz hangs around.  The wine is unmistakably, very fresh with almost crunch acidity supported the spiced red fruit.  The wine is deep at first but with air the fruit brightens up.  This is a textured wine with an ethereal expansion of flavor.  It is rounder near the end when it takes on tartness and weight. ***(*) Now – 2018.

2015 Guillaume Gilles, Les Massardieres – $25
Imported by MacArthur Liquors.  This wine is 100% Gamay.  Alcohol 13%.  Slightly textured with deep flavor of cranberries, red fruit, and a notion of minerals.  It becomes drier towards the finish with additional complexity from spices that last through the aftertaste.  Lovely.  **** Now – 2022.

2015 Jean-Paul Brun, Moulin a Vent Terres Dorees – $25
Imported by Louis/Dressner Selections. Alcohol 13%.  The wine remains focused with a perfumed start, red fruit, and minerals.  There are grapey hints in the tart, watering acidity driven finish.  It is lighter and drier in nature but with a surprisingly creamy finish.  It does not give up much right so is in need of age.  **(*) 2019-2030.

2015 Jean Foillard, Morgon Cote du Py – $40
Imported by Kermit Lynch.  Alcohol 14%.  This wine first reveals tart red fruit, grippy cranberry, and watering acidity.   After several hours the middle rounds out, the baking spices and acidity become integrated, and it develops weight.  It even takes a honied texture in the middle.  I think there is good potential here.  ***(*) 2019-2027.

2015 Lapierre, Morgon en magnum – $55
Imported by Kermit Lynch. Alcohol 13.5%.  There is mineral driven red fruit with some black hints.  The flavors are dense, somewhat low-lying, with a sweaty and earthy finish.  *** Now – 2018.

2016 Lapierre, Morgon – $22
Imported by Kermit Lynch. Alcohol 13%.  A good nose is followed by fresh and perfumed flavors in the mouth. The clean red fruit has grapey weight and a ripe, lifted finish.  Crisp compared to the 2015 vintage.  ***(*) Now – 2019.