Home > History of Wine, Image > Map of an individual Phylloxera “spot” in a Zinfandel vineyard in California

Map of an individual Phylloxera “spot” in a Zinfandel vineyard in California


The final Phylloxera map for today stems from an United States Department of Agriculture Bulletin focused on the Phylloxera in California published in 1921.  This map indicate the spread of Phylloxera in a Zinfandel vineyard by indicating the state of each individual vine.  Thus dead vines are represented by solid circles whereas the varying states of the other vines is indicated by a letter.  After looking at the legend, I find it is easy to understand the map.  I hope you enjoyed these four different Phylloxera maps.

Fig. 2 - Phylloxera "spot" in Zinfandel vineyard, charted in 1914. [1]

Fig. 2 – Phylloxera “spot” in Zinfandel vineyard, charted in 1914. [1]


[1] Bulletin of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. … no. 901-925 (1920-1921).  URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2027/njp.32101050725728

  1. Collette Thompson
    September 28, 2015 at 5:08 pm

    I love reading your posts and look forward to each one.

    I have a question about these maps. Do you know how far back they? I am especially interested in knowing more about the impacts of phylloxera in the Ohio River Valley region near Cincinnati/ Northern Kentucky.

    Thank you for sharing your passion with us!
    Collette

    Collette Thompson
    Scripps Howard Center for Civic Engagement
    Northern Kentucky University

    859-572-7847 direct; 859-572-1448 office

    • September 29, 2015 at 9:25 am

      Collette, thank you for your kind words. I have not done an exhaustive search but while there is ample published research during the 1870s, most maps appear to date from the 1880s and later.

      Aaron

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