Home > History of Wine > “Jerome Bowie, sumlyer, of all wynes that he sall desyre to the Kings Maiesteis vse”: The 16th century history of sommeliers.

“Jerome Bowie, sumlyer, of all wynes that he sall desyre to the Kings Maiesteis vse”: The 16th century history of sommeliers.


This is my second post exploring the history of the sommelier.  Though this position has existed for centuries, there is incredibly no comprehensive history in English.  Please find my first post at “[S]mashed [the bottles of wine] publically and then left him for dead”: The Early Association of Sommelier with Wine.

When James VI toured through Scotland in 1617, it was the culmination of two years of advanced planning.[1]  James VI was King of Scotland since 1567 and became King of England and Ireland in 1603.  His unique position as the son of Mary, Queen of Scots and the great-great-grandson of Henry VII, King of England and Lord of Ireland, enabled him to ascend the throne of the independent sovereign states of England and Scotland.  It was anticipated that some 5,000 people and 5,000 horses would be visiting with James VI.  Such a large group required roads and bridges to be repaired in advance, lodging to be found, and of course the procurement of food and wine.

Mary Stuart, Queen Mary I of Scotland, and her son James, the later King James I of England, 1583.  Image from Wikimedia Commons.

Mary Stuart, Queen Mary I of Scotland, and her son James, the later King James I of England, 1583. Image from Wikimedia Commons.

The general planning for the visit was conducted by the Scottish Privy Council which was the body that advised the monarch of Scotland as well as carried out executive and judicial orders.   In the Register of the Privy Council the detailed planning records for the visit of James VI may be found.  Between £200,000 and £229,000 was spent on the trip.  Of this amount, £48,000 was assigned “for purchase of wines etc.” with over £17,000 spent on wine alone.  These funds were not haphazardly spent for the money was given to Jamies Baillie and James Bowie who was “servand of his majesties wyne sellair”.[2]  The transportation of the wine was important enough that “Sarjand Bowy” was furnished with a ship so that he could “lay in the cavys of his palicis at Halyruidhous, and uther partis of his resort.”[3]

James Bowie came from a family long involved in wine.  Like his father, he too was the Master of the King’s Wines.  Though somewhat sadly, it was a position he was only appointed to upon his father’s death in 1597.  Of great interest is that both of these men were considered “His Majestie’s symlier” or sommelier.[4]

In my post “[S]mashed [the bottles of wine] publically and then left him for dead”: The Early Association of Sommelier with Wine I relate how very little research has been conducted into the history of sommeliers.  I note that the earliest reference to sommelier in early modern English dates to 1543, when the King of France granted “readily that Henry’s ‘sommelier’ at Bordeaux should be suffered to depart with the wines he had bought there for [King] Henry [VIII].”  Unfortunately there is no contextual information about who this sommelier was nor the range of responsibilities.  The fact that we can link both James Bowie and his father Jerome Bowie as Master of the King’s Wine to the position of sommelier thus becomes very important.  It demonstrates that the French term of sommelier was applied to non-French citizens and helps define the role of a sommelier in England and Scotland during the 16th century.

This royal link between sommelier and Master of King’s Wines is further echoed in Erienne Pasquier’s description in Les Recherches de La France (1621) that a sommelier carried bottles of wine for princes and great lords.  However, the Master of King’s Wines carried more responsibility than simply a porter of wine for royalty.  Indeed, “Jeremy Bowie, simleir” received “letters of commissioun for visiting, taisting, and uptaking of wynis to the furnissing of his Majesteis house upoun ressonabill prices”.[5]  Not only could Jerome Bowie search houses in boroughs and towns but he could also search ships.  As the King’s sommeliers they often looked for the “best sorts” of “new Burdealx wyne”.[6]

The King’s sommelier purchased a variety of wines include Spanish and “hottopys” or haut pays but it was Bordeaux that was the favorite.[7]  This taste for Bordeaux wine was certainly cultivated during the Auld Alliance between Scotland and France.[8]  The close ties and favorable trading arrangements meant that many Scots setup in Bordeaux as “warehousemen, retailers, and factors.”  It is perhaps through this active trade in Bordeaux that the term sommelier fell into use.

Angliae, Scotiae Et Hiberniae. 1570. David Rumsey Map Collection.

Angliae, Scotiae Et Hiberniae. 1570. David Rumsey Map Collection.

We know that the sommelier was used in official correspondence during the second half of the 16th century thanks to the informative Dictionary of the Old Scottish Tongue (up to 1700).  This dictionary details several dozen entries mentioning sommelier from 1559 through 1599.  These entries chronicle the variations in spelling: symmular, symliar, simleir, symmolier, symbleris, symblair, sumlieris, and even semlairs to name a few. It is not yet clear that every single entry refers to a sommelier of wine.

The majority of the original texts do, however, refer to the Bowie family but there are other sommeliers involved with wine such as “Leonard Baillie, summeleir to oure Soveranis” meaning Mary, Queen of Scots.[9]  In reviewing the various texts it appears to me that a sommelier was a royal officer in charge of sourcing, choosing, buying, and transporting wine for the monarch.  It would be fascinating to learn further details about the sommelier’s daily life within the royal house but I am not sure if that documentation exists.  Until then, the evolution of the sommelier from a royal position should be told.


[1] McNeill, William A. and McNeill, Peter G.B. The Scottish Progress of James VI, 1617. The Scottish Historical Review, Vol. 75, No. 199, Part 1 (Apr., 1996), pp. 38-51
[2] The Register of the Privy Council of Scotland. Vol XI, 1616-1619.  1894. URL:
[3] The Historie and Life of King James the Sext.  From 16th and 17th century sources printed in 1826. URL: https://books.google.com/books?id=-1sJAAAAIAAJ&pg=PP1#v=onepage&q&f=false
[4] Bowie, Walter Worthington. The Bowies and Their Kindred.  1899. URL: https://archive.org/details/bowiestheirkindr00bowi
[5] The Register of the Privy Council of Scotland, Volume 3. URL: https://books.google.com/books?id=qmEhAQAAMAAJ&pg=PR3#v=onepage&q&f=false
[6] Extracts from the Records of the Burgh of Edinburgh: Index, a.d. 1403-1589, and a glossary of peculiar words. 1882. URL: https://books.google.com/books?id=lYE1AQAAMAAJ&pg=PP7#v=onepage&q&f=false
[7] The Register of the Privy Council of Scotland, Volume 3.
[8] Lynch, Michael. The Oxford Companion to Scottish History. 2007.
[9] The Register of the Privy Council of Scotland, Volume I. 1877. URL: https://books.google.com/books?id=ByQ5AQAAMAAJ&pg=PP1#v=onepage&q&f=false

  1. Robert Bowie
    August 22, 2015 at 6:20 pm

    e were Wine Keepers for the King from at least 1569-1646,. Thus we can say we were Wine Keepers for the King for at least 73 years, and before as gunnars, and beyond as messengers, a significant time in the turbulent changes that were happening in Scotland and Later in England. We find James Bowie serving as Master of the Kings Wines at first for Prince Henry in 1594,, then later by 1598 taking on his fathers duties to the King, after Jerome Bowie passes. He lives in at least three places. Bowies Ludging in Stirling on St. Mary’s Wynd, then in Cannongate, when King James moved to Holyrood Palace at Edinburgh, before 1601. Then down to the the Sill House in the Strand, near Durham House in London about 1614 with James VI/I, and further service until c. 1642, his sons continue to serve as messengers, and one is actually caputured and sent to the tower of London, possibly ending this line of Bowies, as the daughters appear to inherit property only. Of note there were nine children, and at this point we have traced four.

    21 November 1584, Halieruidhous. Gift to James Bowye, lawful son of Jerome Bowie, ‘sumblair’ to the King, ‘for his better intertenyment at the scholes and flurischeing in gude lettris,’ of two monks’ portions in the abbey of Dumfermeling, with chambers and yards, vacant by decease of denes Robert Broun and John Hoghart; the gift to be valid notwithstanding the act of Parliament anent provision for the guard. li, 117 v. (Register of the Privy Seal of Scotland Vol. VIII 1581-1584 p. 454). (Anent means alongside, so this implies he is in the King’s Gaurd as well.)(was he in the gaurd or his father ref?)

    1594 February James Bowie was made master of Prince Henry’s wine cellar and cuphouse ‘for life with such fees and duties as his father. (PS.1/67,fos.85r-v.)

    He apparently takes over right away in his fathers duties after his father Jerome Bowie’s passing. He is appointed Master of the King’s wine cellar and sommelie (PS 1/69 fo.176r)

    1598
    Item to Patrik Ronnald baxter Cristell Lamb maister cuke in the kingis grace kiching Frances Galbraith maister in his grace pantrie James Bog maister in his hienes aill sellar Walter Neische maister in the lairdnar and James Bowie maister in the wyne sellar everie ane of thame takand ane hundreth merkfs summa 400 (1598-9 REGUM SCOTORUM p.279 )

    1598 Anne of Denmark favored Rheinish wines, and ordered them while at dalkeith and holyrood in 1598.

    1601 James Bowie paid as sommelier 200L for “wissitting testing and wyling’ of the King’s wines. (E.24/22,fo41r.)

    James Bowie moves to Edinburg and lives at Cannongate as the King had moved his household to Holyrood. The Bowies owned a large part of the land which now is under the new Modern Parliment house at Cannongate. (goes to his daughter and then to the Scott of Spencerfield by marriage).

    He christens his first child in Edinburg in 1601

    July 3, 1602 Edinburg. Fixing of proof for 12 July for John Earl of Marl and James Murray of Halzairds to produce Thomas Barbour, James Stalker, and James Bowie as witnesses in action at their instance again Mr. Edward Merschell clerk of the commissariot in Edinburgh, Magdalen Barroun, relict of Mr James Richie, clerk of the said commissariot, James Sandelandis of Calder, Sir James Sandelandis of Slamanno concerning a process of adherence at the instance of the deceased Janet Murray, lady Torphichen against the deceased James, Lord Torphichen her spouse..(Papers of Major P.I.C. Payne Collection Folder50).

    James Bowie of this congregation and Elizabeth Creichtoun in the South Eist parish of Edinburgh p.9 Dec. m. 16 December 1602 (Cannongate Register of Marriages p. 600). This indicates James is from Cannongate parish and she is from SE Edinburgh parish, indicating residing nearby. The parish of Cannongate also was known as Holyroodhouse parish.

    37 Maii 5 1603 JACOBUS BOWIE heires Jeremie Bowie patrís in tenemento terra cum horto in villa de Borrowstouness et baronia de Kynneil cum terris arabilibus cisdem spectantibus ex antiquo nuncupatis ane fewland extendentibus ad 6 acras E 27s 8d iii 19. Inquisitionum Ad Capellam Domini Regis Retornatarum, Quae in …, Volume 2)(INQUISITIONES SPECIALES linlithgow number 37).

    This google translates to:
    37 May 5, 1603, James Bowie heires Jeremy Bowie father in a tenement with a garden in the town of Borrowstouness land with arable same, belonging to the ancient barony of Kynneil call ane fewland to a 6 acres of the 27s 8d iii 19.

    This above is very exciting to find, it shows the father of James as Jeremy, as in this Wine Keeper Line, that Jeremy Bowie had land, tenement and garden at Barrowstowness, which just happens to be another prominent Bowie line we have found and another whole book exists on. Since this Bowie line came over to work under the Earl of Mar, as a servant, then to service for the Kings, and Queens of Scotland, it makes sense its early origins may be from Barrowstowness or Bo’ness as it is better known. Dont forget the grandfather of James here was Andro Bowy, Gunnar Ordinaire and servant to Queen Mary. Kinneil is mentioned associated with the Earl of Arran (Hamiltons). This would probalby be the land owned by his grandfather as well, Andrew Bowy, as Kinneil was the seat of the Hamiltons in Eastern Scotland.

    1603 Whilst in the charge of James Bowye or Bovey, Sergeant of the Cellar (cf. SP,
    Dom., 1619-23, p. 635), to whom the cup was issued on 17 July 1603, the steeple was damaged. Bowey was debited in 1618 for same (Jewels and plate of Queen Elizabeth I, By Arthur Jefferies Collins 1955 p 543)

    Note King’s Serjeant (the rank falls between a knight and an esquire)

    0 15 0 Item mair in smallis debursit for the wyne sellar in furnischeings 3 10 0 Item payit to Joseph Merjoribankis, baillie, for his deburse- mentis in his awin hous quhen he maid the banket to James Maxwell, James Bowie and uther (Extracts from the Records of the Burgh of Edinburgh: 1604-1626)

    New Years, 1605, Roll of New Years Gifts, King given a bottle of ypocras by Sargeant Bowy. Also Anna Bowie , gave King one handkercher of cambrick, edgd with Venice gold lace, delivered to Mr. John Murrey. Bibliographical list of miscellaneous eulogistic tributes to King James and his family, published during his reign in England”: v. 1, pl xlii-xlvi.

    1606 James Bowey mentioned as one of the Kings Household

    1607 Signet bill index, James Bowye July 1607 Office p87.

    1607 November Bowy is in contact with King James VI with a message at Royston that a quantity of Frontenac wine was available. To which he received the Kings reply to deliver some to the Earl of Salisbury.

    January 4, 1608
    Warrant to pay Jas. Bovy, Serjeant of the Cellar, 451£ 10s., in discharge of bills given by him and Mons. de Vitry, fro provision of French Wines and fruit for the King’s use. [Docquet.] Ref James I:Volume31: January-March, 1608, Calendar of State Papers Domestic. p393-420. (Louis de L’Hospital, Marquis de Vitry).

    1608 July 14
    To James Boy, Esquire, serjeant of his Highness’s cellar, in prest, being sent in to France, to make provision of some kind of wines on the place where they grow, which he knoweth to be fittest for his Highness’s use; and upon his return and his account yielded and allowed by the officers of his Highness’s household, to pay all such further sums of money that shall appear by his account so allowed to be due for the said provisions. by a Privy Seal dated 14 July, 1608 100L. (Issues of the Exchequer: Being Payments Made Out of His Majesty’s Revenue …By Great Britain. Exchequer p85)(money given in advance-prest, of 100 Pounds to James Boy, who is Esquire and sergeant)(Esquire was a rank, between a gentleman and knight, also a shield bearer).

    July 14. 1608
    Theobalds.Warrant to pay to James Boy, Serjeant of the Cellar, 100£. imprest, for provision of wines upon the place where they grow. [Warrt. Bk., II., p. 46.]Source: James I: Volume 35: July, August, 1608. Calendar of State Papers Domestic: James I, 1603-1610, Mary Anne Everett Green (Editor) (1857).

    1608 Bowey and Jacob listed in expenses of the crown for purchase of wines 1680 L. (? who is Jacob) Note English spelling here of Bowey.

    June 19, 1609
    Westminster.Warrant to pay to James Bovy, Serjeant of the Cellar, 750£. for wines and fruits to be purchased in France. [Warrt., Bk. II., p. 100.]

    From: British History Online
    Source: James I: Volume 45: May, June, 1609. Calendar of State Papers Domestic: James I, 1603-1610, Mary Anne Everett Green (Editor) (1857)

    March 31, 1610
    Hodie Zavice lecta est Billa, An Act for the Naturalizing of James Maxwell, Robert Alton, James Bowye, Robert Browne, William Rider, and Robert Josse, His Majesty’s Servants in ordinary. House of Lords Journal Vol 2 1578-1614 p575.

    July 3, 1610
    Westminster.Warrant to pay to James Bovy, Serjeant of the Cellar, 650£. for providing wines in France for the King. [Warrt. Bk., II., p. 162.] From: British History Online
    Source: James I: Volume 56: July, 1610. Calendar of State Papers Domestic: James I, 1603-1610, Mary Anne Everett Green (Editor) (1857 p622-626)

    June 21. Warrant for payment of 650L. to Jas. Bovey, Serjeant of the Cellar, sent into France to make provision of wines. [TFcm*£. Bk, III., p. 20.]

    Of note, these trips also had a dual function of carrying messages to France, a service his son James also did. “Bowy” is termed an Express Messenger” in French archive letters.

    June. Docquet of the above. [Docquet, June 20.]

    1611 June 22. Grant to Jas. Bovey and Abm. Jacob of 2s. 6d., payable to the King as composition money for every butt or pipe of sweet wine brought into London, Bristol, or Southampton, in consideration of 40 butts of sweet wine, which they are yearly to deliver, free of expense, to the King’s household. [Docquet] (Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, of the Reigns p47)(Bowey and Jacob paid out 1680L in about 1611).

    This is an exerpt from Bowie’s and their Kindred 1899 p. xiii
    June, 1611, “Elizabeth Crichton, wife of Mr. James Bowie, Master of the King’s Wines,” requested permission to send certain servants from her home near Stirling to London to wait upon “the bairns” of James Bowie, “now with their father in London, England.”

    June, 1611 As Beatrix Peirie, servitrix to James Buy, servant of his Majesties “wynsellar”, is, at the command of Elizabeth Crichtoune,, spous to the said James, and now residing at Stirling, about to proceed to England ” for the attending of the said James Buy his bairnes, and his utheris affairis in his hous and familie,” and as a late proclamation forbids any person to repair to England
    by sea without special licence, such licence is hereby given to any master skipper or mariners to convey the said Beatrix to England on her own reasonable charges, without danger of the penalty. (Collections of Styles, etc. Fol. 105, b. Register of the Privy Council of Scotland vol XIV 1545-1625 addenda pub. Edinburgh, 1898).

    1611, August 20.Pensions destined to be given to the King’s servants before Christmas last, 1610. Pensions to Lord Hadington, 400L; Lady Elizabeth Cary, 400L; Mrs.Jane Drummond 500; Cassabone, 300L; Elizabeth Shawe, Sir George Carew, Sir Henry Wotton, Sir Michael Balfour, Sir Henry Balfour, SirJohn Gryme, Sir Robert Nappier, Sir James Fullerton, Sir John Shaw, John Murray, John Gibb, Barnard Lindsay, John Aughmotie, John Levinston, Thomas Lumsden and Archibald Nappier, 200L each, SirRichard Conisbie, Sir Edward Zouche, James Maxwell and George Marshall, 133L each; Patrick Maule and William Ramsey 100L each; John Nesmithe and Ann Barkley, 60L each; James Murray, James Boye and Patrick Young, 50L each; Francis Galbrieth, Robert Browne and James Buchanan, 40L each; Ellis Rothwell, Bevis Theloall, John Carseand Walter Toderick, 26L each. Total, 6,030L. (Endorsed: “20 August, 1611.” (196 50)

    From: ‘Cecil Papers: August 1611′, Calendar of the Cecil Papers in Hatfield House, Volume 21: 1609-1612 (1970), pp. 306-309.)

    1613 June 11 James I recommending James Bowey sergeant of the King’s cellar ordered to repaire into France to make provision of certain wines fruites and other necessaries Greenwich 20 June a 11 1613 f 104 (Catalogue of the Stowe Manuscripts in the British Museum 1895 p 224).

    1613 June 20 mentions James Bowey (B.L. Stowe M.S.174, fol. 104)

    Dec, 1613 A letter, from Chamberlain to Mrs. Alice Carleton contains an account of the entertainment : “Yesterday there was a medley Masque of five English and five Scots, which are called the High Dancers, among whom Sergeant Bowy, one Abercrombie, and Auchmouty, that was at Padua and Venice, are esteemed the most principal and lofty.”Mr. Nichols identified the first of these high-steppers with “Sergeant Bowy,” a clerk in the Royal cellars, who appears in the roll of New Year’s gifts for 1605-6 as giving his Majesty “a botle of ypocras.”4 Mr. Patrick Abercrombie appears in the lists of persons to whom the King gave orders on the Exchequer. Mr. John Auchmuty was one of the Grooms of the King’s Bedchamber, who obtained in 1607-8 a grant of j£2,ooo at once, out of “Recusants'” lands and goods. (Production of the Tempest, Masque at Somerset’s Marriage, William Shakespeare, his family and friends pg 404).

    1614, May 19 London Serjeant Boy [Bovey], of the Cellar, committed to the Marshalsea, for seducing Sir Thos. Gardiner’s daughter.(James 1 – volume 77: May 1614’, Calendar of State Papers Domestic: James I, 1611-18 (1858), pp. 232-236. Letter on May 19 written from Chamberlain at London to Carleton. (Frances or Margaret Gardiner were Sir Thomas Gardiner’s Daughters).

    1614 May 20 Sergeant Buoy of the seller was on Tewsday committed to the Marshalsee for that lieng in Sir Thomas Gardiners house as a frend, he abused his daugther under colour of mariage having a wife and nine children in Scotland (The letters of John Chamberlain – Part 1 – Page 531).(in Ludgings of Stirling it implies he has only two daughters, thus 7 sons).

    1614 A warrant to the Keeper of the Marshallsea to suffer James Achinson to have accesse to James Bouye serjant of this Majesties of his Majestie’s wine seller, from tyme to tyme, as occasion shall require. Lord Chamberlen, Earl of Worcester, Lord Wotton, M….(may be relative to him as see Margaret Acheson under James Bowie his son).(a James Acheson does have daughter Margaret Acheson)

    1614 May 24 A warrant to the Keeper of the Marshalsea, to enlarge and sett at liberty the person of James Bovye, sargant of his Majesties’s wine sellar. (Acts of the Privy Council of England Issued by Authority of the Lords Commissioners of His Majesty’s Treasury Under the Direction of the Master of the Rolls p447). He appears to only have been iimprisoned for 4 days.

    The Tonnage and Poudage Act was passed in June, 1614. Tonnage meant the Tax levied upon each ton of wine coming in or going out of the Kingdom. This was granted to Charles I for a year only, but he continued to levy custom duties well after.

    1614 July 13 Warrant to pay to Jas. Bovy 128L., disbursed by him above the last year’s allowance for wines. Also to advance him 120L. for the present year. [Sign Man., vol. IV., No. 33.]

    Docquet of the above. [Docquet, July 14.]

    1614 (Westminster) July 23. Licence for Jas. Bovy, Serjeant of the Cellar, to pass beyond seas for providing wines. [Docquet, July 24.]

    1614 July ? Warrant to the farmers of French and Rhenish wines for payment of 1,584L. to Jas. Bovy for fifty-five tuns of wine, to be yearly furnished for the King’s use. [Ibid., No. 67.]

    1614 Dec 9 Lease from Thos Wilson of Hertford to Jas Bovy Serjeant of the Cellar of the Sill House in the Strand near Durham House in London (Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, of the Reigns p262)

    On December 9, 1614, a lease was granted from Thomas Wilson of Hertford to James Bovy, Serjeant of the Cellar of ” the Sill House in the Strand, near Durham House.” 2 The Sill stood probably by Durham Rents, a dwelling-house, garden, etc., in St. Martin’s-in-the-Fields, between Durham House, Britain’s Burse, York House, and the River, Cat. State Papers, 1611-1618, p. 262. iv. p. 364, note. (note Durham house was where Walter Raleigh lived with his wife).

    1616 [The king] directed … Sarjand Bowy, his symmoler of wynis, with a ship furneist therwith, to lay in the cavys of his palicis at Halyruidhous and uther partis of his resort; Hist. Jas. VI (1825) 395.

    1616 ‘bacaus His-Majestie, be report, was to repair in Scotland the nixt year, God willing and in respect, he wald be convoyit and conducted be certen noblis of Ingland, he wald let them naw that this cuntrie was nothing inferior to thers in anie respect: And therefore directed in Scotland Sarjand Bowy, his Symmoler of wynis, with a ship furneist therwith, to lay in the cavys of his palicis of Halyruidhous, and uther partis of his resort. Note he is directed to go to Scotland here, so in England at this time. (The Historie and Life of King James the Sext: being an account of the affairs of Scotland from… By John Colville, Thomas Thomson Printed … from a manuscript in the Library of the Marquess of Lothian at Newbattle Abbey p395).(James Bowie now in Scotland).

    1617 January The Lordis of Secreit Counsall Commissioneris of his Majesties Rentis ordanis Sir Gedeone Murray of Elibank, knicht, Deputie Thesaurair, to delyver to James Bowye, servand of his Majesties wyne sellair, the sowme of tuelff hundreth pundis usual money of this kingdome oute of the first and reddiest of his Majesteis moneyis being in his cofferis, or of the reddiest of the taxatioun being in the said Sir Gedeounis handis and keeping, and that for the changes and expensis of the said James Bowye in attending his Majesteis service in this cuntrey, and for defraying of his chairges and expensis to France, whairunto he is now directit be the saidis Lordis for some special! occasionis of his Majesteis affairis and service. Anent the payment and delyverie of the quhilk sowme to the said James Bowye the extract of thir presentis with the said James acquittance salbe unto the said Sir Gideoun ane sufficient warrand.(James Bowye expenses in his Majesty’s service in Scotland and in the special visit he is directed to make to France, January 1617).

    1617 January Minute Book of Processes Warrand to the Thesaurair to pay James Bowie 1200 Pounds (Register of the privy council of Scotland, p25)

    1617January 23. On the 23rd we hear of a mission of James Bowie, his Majesty’s cellarer, to France, with £1200 in his pocket, for the purchase, it would seem, of superior wines- for his Majesty’s table (Intro section, Register of the privy council of Scotland, p. x).

    1617 25 Feb A passe for Thomas Christi, servaunt to Mr. Bovy, serjeaunt of his Majesty’s cellar to goe over into the Lowe Countries (Act of the Privy Council of England Part 2, 1967 p. 158).

    Before May 16, 1617 the visit of James VI to Holyrood.Many of the other arrangements over which the Privy Council toiled for weary months give a curious view of the limitationsof the time. For instance, eighteen merchants in Edinburgh and one at Burntisland undertook to supply “James Bowye, servand of his Majesteis wyne-sellair,” with the wine required for Holyrood Palace.

    1617 Cannongate, James Bowie ‘servant to the king’ granted a sasine of property formerly owned by Wood comprising a tenement of land with yeard and coble (trough) on the south side of the Cannongate (Scotland’s parliament site and the Canongate: archaeology and history By Holyrood Archaeology Project Team, Society of Antiquaries of Scotland p. 110)

    1617 June 30 James Bowie, Burgess and Guild Brethren Serjant of his Maj. wynesellar, gratis 30 June 1617 at James VI. Banquet. (Edinburgh Burgess Roll p.68)

    James Bowie, Sergeant of his King’s Wine Cellar, admitted a Burgess 17 July 1617, children Anna and Elizabeth. (Old Ludgings of Stirling, Eneas MacKay, 1897).

    17 July 1617, “James Bowyie, serjant of his Majesteis selleris; and William Bowyie his servitour. They were made Burgesses of the Royal Burgh of Stirling Gratis (no charge-ed.)(Extracts from rec. of Royal Burgh of Stirling 1519-1666 p.148).(William may be James’s son and was possibly the letter carrier for the king ‘servitour’) below

    1617 August 7 at Brougham, Lake to Winwood. For a warrant to be signed for the usual payments to Serjeant Bovey, who is going to France for provisions [of wine] for the King.

    1617” By Order, dated 18th of September, 1617. To James Bowey, serjeant of ihs Majesty’s Celler, who is, by his Majesty’s direction, to into France, to make provision of several sorts of wine, grapes, and other fruits, for his Majesty’s own use, as in former years he hath been accustomed, the sum of 400L., towards the payment and discharge of the saide provisions. By writ, dated 25th August, 1617. (Issues of the Exchequer: Being Payments Made out of his Majesty’s Revenue During the Reign 1603-1625 (James I, Pell records page204).(Frederick Devon, Issues of the Exchequer, London, 1836 p 204)(Issue Roll of Thomas De Brantingham, Bishop of Exeter, Pell records p204).

    Elisabeth, Daughter of James Bowie and Eliz Crichtone b. 5th October 1617. Cannongate.
    (from Deborah Batchen 11/7/97 email).

    1618 (by James I at Westminster) July 17. Warrant to advance 400L. to Jas. Bovey, Serjeant of the Cellar, for provision of wines, fruits, and grapes out of France. [Calender of State Papers-Domestic James I p.555 No. 38.]

    1619 (by James I at Westminster) July 12. Warrant to advance to Jas. Bovey, Serjeant of the Cellar, going into France, 400L., for providing wines, fruits, and grapes for the King’s use. [Sign Man., vol. X., No. 33.]

    1619 October 16. Merlou. The same to the Duke de Mayenne. I request a letter to the Mayor and Jurats of Bordeaux ordering them to allow free pass to M. de Bouye for twenty barrels of Frontignac wine for the use of the King my master.(Copy in French) (Earl of Powis Manuscrpts, in Tenth Tenth report: appendix. The manuscripts of the Earl of Westmorland Part 4 p382)

    1620 (Westminster) July 12. Warrant to advance 400L. to Jas. Bovey, for provision of wines, fruits, and grapes, for the King’s use. [Ibid,, No. 75.] James 1 – volume 116 July 1620.

    1621, May 2, “L. 3a. An Act for the Naturalization of Sir Ro. Ayton Knight, and James Bowy Esquire: – Upon Question, passed”. House of Commons Journal Volume 1: 02 May 1621. House of Commons Journal Volume 1, (1802)

    1621, May 9 , Hodie lavice lecta est Billa, An Act for the Naturalizing of Sir Robert Ayton, Knight, and James Bowie, Esquire, Serjeant of his Majesty’s Wine-Cellar. House of Lords Journal Volume 3: 9 May 1621p.126-9

    1621, May 28 James Bowie, Serjeant of his Majesty’s wine cellar and Sir Robert Ayton, Knight (Bill passed the Lords on the 28 May 1621 See C.J. I. 570, 575 L. J. III 113, 117, 129, 136).(Hugenot society of London, 1911)

    1621 Ayton and Bowie’s Naturalization.
    The House was moved, That the Bill for the Naturalizing of Sir Robert Ayton, Knight, and James Bowie, Serjeant of His Majesty’s Wine Cellar, might be amended in the Title and Body of the Bill; which was presently done, and the Amendments Twice read, and written in Paper, annexed to the Bill, for that the same came up from the Commons.
    Hodie vice lecta est Billa, An Act for the Naturalizing of Sir Robert Ayton, Knight, and James Bowie, Serjeant of His Majesty’s Wine Cellar; and, being put to the Question, was Assented unto. From: ‘House of Lords Journal Volume 3: 28 May 1621’, Journal of the House of Lords: volume 3: 1620-1628 (1767-1830), pp. 135-138. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=30318&strquery=Bowie

    1621 Bowie, James, Sargeant of His Majesties Wine Cellar, was Granted IRISH Denization 28 May, 1621 (IPR)(Scots-Irish links, 1575-1725, Volume 3 By David Dobson p19)

    1622 Feb 8, An Act for the Naturalizing of Sir Robert Ayton, Knight, and James Bowie, Esquire, Serjeant of His Majesty’s Wine Cellar. From: ‘Note of bills: 8 February 1622’, Journal of the House of Lords: volume 3: 1620-1628 (1802), pp. 203-04.

    1622 May 19 Charles, Prince of Wales, afterwards King of England Doc. s. thin vellum, St. James, 19 May, 1622, A Writ of Privy Seal for payment of £525 to James Bowy for wines. With Autograph Note and Signature of the Prince also at foot (p50 Catalogue of museum of John Sainsbury)

    1622 July 18. (King James I at Westminster) Warrant to advance to Jas. Bovey, Serjeant of the King’s Cellar, repairing into France, 400L., for provision of high country and other wines, fruits, and grapes. [Sign Man., vol. XIV., No. 7.]

    1622-3, March 2, letter from King James to his sons, references ‘last penult’ , or latest letter carried by Bowy. This may be one of James Bowie’s sons as the letter by the King to his sons, states ”
    My Young Boys,
    Yesterday I wrote and answer to your letters by young Bowie, whom I sent because I know he will be quickly with you, and my baby may either make use of his service there, or when he had use to make a quick despatch, I know none that can carry swifter than he. (this may be William Bowyie)

    (?date) As I did wret before, their is sume of his servands to followe him. Sume are pairted by sea at the West alreddye, and sume are gone throw France bye post, whereof Bowye, his sone is one and with letters from (page 154) Index shows Bowy (Bowye), Mr. Sargeant, 70 bis., son of 154. (Ref: Report on the Manuscripts of the Earl of Mar and Kellie: Preserved at Alloa House, Clackmannanshire By Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts pub 1930 pg 70, 154, 263)(note continued connection with Earl of Mar here)

    1623 June
    …of Lenox. treasurer of, see Edmondes, Sir Thos. officers of reform of supplies for serjeant of the cellar to, see Bovey, Jas. servants of service to privy chamber of presence chamber of bedchamber, grooms and pages of Janson , Mich..’Index: J, K’, Calendar of State Papers Domestic: James I, 1619-23 (1858), pp. 671-675.

    Bowy, James, Serjeant of the Cellar (flourishing 1611-22) (Bovey, Buy). Performer in masques (News from the New World Discovered in the Moon, 1620; Pan’s Anniversary, 1620; Masque of Augurs, 1622; Time Vindicated to Herself and Her Honours, (January, 1623). [Herford and Simpson, Ben Jonson X, 429 (1950)] Biographical Index of English Drama Before 1660. Bowy (Bovey or Buy), James, Sergeant of the Cellar, danced in News from the New World, Pan’s Anniversary, The Masque of Au-gurs, and Time Vindicated. (A Ben Jonson Companion By Dewey Heyward Brock 1983 p.175).(see 1613 reference). These are probably done by his son James who danced with Prince Charles in the 1620’s Masques. In 1622 the Masque of Augurs had an opening scene in compliment to James Bowy. It was done in the first show at Indigo Jones new Banqueting house, and it opened in a mock version of the court buttery, the most accessible area of the Sargeant of the Cellars domain, and the audience would have recognized this to be in part Jones humerous tribute to Bowy.

    1624 July 16, London, Warrant to ship-owners and officers to assist Jas. Bovey, Serjeant of the Cellar, in transportation of wines and fruits bought abroad for the King’s use, on his payment of reasonable freights. ([Docquet.] Calendar of state papers / Domestic series Reigns James I Volume 11 By Robert Lemon p303)

    1624 (King James I in London) Oct. 12. Warrant to pay to Jas. Bovey, Serjeant of the Cellar, 400L., for provision of French wines and fruits, for the King’s use. [Docquet] p303

    1625 March
    Thos. clerk of the kitchen to, see Pay, Nich. serjeant of the acatry to serjeant of the cellar to, see Bovey, Jas. footmen and messengers of servants to special or secret service to bedchamber, grooms and pages of, see also…Index: J, K’, Calendar of State Papers Domestic: James I, 1623-25 (1859), pp. 646-651.

    1628 A sasine is dated 31 Jan. 1628 for James Bowie, Master of the King’s Cellars. Vol 13 folio 104. Edingburgh.

    En 1629, les marchands de vinsfrançais et la com pagnie des cabaretiers de Londres ayant signalé à l’auto rité la grande quantité de vins qui leur restait sur les bras, le conseil émit l’avis de prohiber, ‘au moins pour un temps, toute importation ultérieure; encore nos vins ne devaient-ils être admis qu’en navires anglais’; mais cette dernière disposition ne devait guère être obser véei’. Dans l’intervalle, la paix’ entre les deux couronnes avait été proclamée à Bordeaux, avec la liberté du com merce. Le gouvernement de Charles Ier l’apprit par des lettres interceptées à bord d’un navire écossais parti de ce port avec un chargement de vins 4, et le commerce entre les deux pays ne tarda pas à recommencer par ?otte comme autrefois, avec des interruptions causées par les ?uctuations politiquesl. On peut prendre une idée de l’importance des affaires que les Anglais faisaient avec notre place quand on voit un marchand de Bor deaux, Abel Denys, créancier d’un sergent Bowye pour la somme énorme de 700 livres sterling, valeur reçue en vins’. Une année où, à ce qu’il paraît, les affaires étaient dans un état de stagnation, en 1635, un certain Canezil les 5, marchand de Bordeaux, présenta au ministère les propositions suivantes comme un sûr moyen pour réta- blir le commerce :

    French to English translation

    In 1629, merchants and vinsfrançais company of London publicans who reported self rity large amount of wine that remained on the arms, the Board opined prohibit, at least for a time, any subsequent importation; yet our wines should they be accepted in English ships, but this provision could hardly be observed véei ‘. In the meantime, peace between the two crowns had been proclaimed in Bordeaux, with the freedom of com merce. The government of Charles I learned it by letters intercepted a ship Scottish party this port with a cargo of 4 wines, and trade between the two countries soon to start by fleet as before, with interruptions caused by fluctuations politiquesl. We can get an idea of the importance of business that the English were with our place when we see a merchant Bor deaux, Abel Denys, a sergeant Bowye creditor for the enormous sum of 700 pounds sterling, value received wine.

    1632 Maxwell supplied his signature to an order for James Bowye (regarding coronation issues with Charles I).

    1632 May 18. no.57. Petition of Michael Borthwick to the King. Abel Denys, a merchant of Bourdeaux, claims near 7,000£. for wines delivered in the King’s father’s time to Mr. Serjeant Bowy. Denys came over some seven years ago in hope to receive the amount, but was delayed by Bowy, and driven away by the plague and business at home. Since then his solicitor has either neglected or been slighted in the business. Petitioner being in France, and being assured by Denys of the justice of his claim, assigned him some moneys due to petitioner in that country to receive so much of Serjeant Bowy, which he did the rather on account of the complaints he heard that anything provided for the household of this Crown should not be discharged. Prays a reference to such honourable persons as the King may think fit. Underwritten,

    1632 c. Abel Denys, creancier, d’un Sergent Bowye pour la somme enorme de 700 livres sterling, valeur recue en vins (at Bordeaux France, Ref Histoire du commerce et de la navigation à Bordeaux and State Papers Domestic Series, Charles I, 1632 Vol ccxvi No. 57).

    1632 June 7 To The Thesaurer and Thesaurer Deputie.
    Our pleasur is, according to our former warrant to the E. of Mar, then our Thesaurer, that yow pay vnto James Bowie, serjant of our wyne seller, or his assigneyis, the feyis dew vnto him as master of our wyne seller of that our kingdome, according as is mentionat in the gift grantit thervpon by our late royall father, togidder with the arrieris therof, and that out of the first and readiest of our rents or casualiteis whatsoever remaneing in your handis, or which heirefter shall accrese vnto ws: And for your soe doeing these presents shalbe vnto yow a sufficient warrant and discharge.—Grenwitch, 7 of Junij 1632.)(Earl of Stiring register of royal letters p597)(It appears under Charles I that James Bowie was not recieving proper pay for a period of time, as given by King James VI).

    1633 James Fentoun, Burgess and Guild Brethren servitor to James Bowie, serjeand of his majesties wyn sellar (C.l. Banquet) 23 June 1633 (Roll of Edinburgh Burgesses p 178) (see later 1661 reference below).

    1633 Jan. 11 Warrant for Sergeant Bowey, to repair into France, for making provision of wine and fruits for his Majesty, and to take with him four servants, four horses and other necessaries, with clauses for assistance to him in transporting the wines and fruit into this kingdom. [Docquet.](Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles I, 1631-3 (1862) Charles I – volume 5 p512)

    May 16, 1633 Charles I returns to Scotland at Ediburgh for his coronation, led by “a splendid retinue, which included the officers of the royal household which formed a bodygaurd. and 500 English noblemen.(Story of Edinburgh Castle p122)

    1638 [March.] 97. Book of names of all his Majesty’s servants and their servants in the Court below stairs, ” anno xiiiito,” which began on the 27th inst.; no doubt prepared for the commissioners appointed to reform the King’s household. The number of the King’s servants here enumerated was 245 ; the number of their servants who are to continue 133 ; the number of servants to be dismissed 61. [21 pp.]

    1639 Petition of James Bowey to the same. Notwithstanding your Majesty’s directions to the Lord Treasurer for payment of 775L. arrears due to petitioner of his pension of 100L. per annum, he has received as yet no part of the same. Has discovered 900L. collected long since for your Majesty’s use, but never paid into the Exchequer, nor likely to be paid without this discovery. Prays order for a letter to the Lord Treasurer, willing him to cause a tally to be struck, and give a lawful discharge to the parties discovered in the annexed schedule. [1 p.] Annexed, 43. I. Schedule setting forth that Thomas Trafford, senior, late Receiver of the King’s revenues in North Wales, and Thomas Trafford, junior, are indebted to his Majesty 900L. collected by them in the six shires of North Wales for knighthood moneys, whereby their lands are extended at 100L. per annum till the debt be paid. (Calendar of State Papers, Domestic series, of the reign of Charles I, Volume 15 p.136).

    1641, July Will made out by James Bowey per chancery record.

    1642 Charter for James Bowie described as “Rijand of his Maj. cellaris (Lauderdale papers NRA(S)832/25/4).

    1642 BOWEY James (the elder) of parish St Martin in the Fields (Lands in Scotland) Will (50 Cambell) proven April 20 by Isaac Dorislaus LLD P.r. John Fowler Admon t.a.i. Oct 1 1641 to dau ELIZ. B renounced. Admon Feb 21 1656-7 to Frances Colthrop; exors. both deceased (Prerogative Court of Canterbury anno 1642 p161) This implies a son James, that he was of Scotland and still held land there, and that his executors were both deceased by 1656-7 implying perhaps Elizabeth Bowie died before 1656-7.. A copy of this will would be very useful. (Admon is a will)

    1642 A Sasine is dated 7 Dec. 1642 for James Bowie, servant to the King (Charles I). This is probably James Bowie, son of the sargeant and land being confirmed to him, it also implies this James is the eldest surviving at the time of his children).

    A Testament, Dative and Inventory was entered January 11, 1647 for James Bowie servitor to his Majesty’s Winecellars. Note the plural use of cellars.

    This was also found, and its thought to apply to this James Bowie as well or possibly his son.

    1646 Bovey, James of p. St. Martin in the Fields Middlxl,(Esq., Groom of the Privy Chamber to his Highness the Prince). Admon w. will (40 Twisse) Ap. 16 to cousin Margt. Acheson alias Brown. N.E. (Church of England. Province of Canterbury. Prerogative Court. Volume: 4 p85) King Charles I was executed at Whitehall on 30 January 1649, this confirms James Bovey was serving Prince Charles later King Charles II. This should be James Bovey, son of the Sargent of the wine cellar.

    This was found regarding a Groom of the Privy chamber.
    That four of the grooms of the privy chamber shall at all times of the day be waiting in the privy chamber to perform such services as appertaineth to them and during their attendance there according to the ancient order of the King’s house shall forbear to wear their cloaks and swords This again indicates that when not in the kings chamber, we were armed. As a singular mark of favour, they were empowered to execute the King’s verbal command without producing any written order; their person and character being deemed sufficient authority.

    Bowie’s Court, St. Mary’s Wynd, Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland…
    A court encircled by high walls, and entered by a ruined archway, encloses what is described in an instrument of sasine in favour of the then proprietor, dated 1st June, 1659, as all and haill that tenement of land, close, yard, little house and little yard upon the north side of the said tenement “now converted into ane hale great ludging or tenement of land, and ane yard, all pertaining of old to Jerome Bowie, thereafter to the deceased James Bowie, sergeant of the late king’s wine cellar, his son, thereafter to the deceased Anna and Elizabeth Bowie, his only daughters, etc., lying within said burgh at the foot of St. Mary’s Wynd therof, and on the east side of the same betwixt the high street that leads to the Bridge of Stirling on the east, the way or passage that leads to the Gowane Hills on the north, and the yard of the deceased Andrew Young on the south parts.”
    The “great ludging” was erected on the family property by James Bowie in 1626. He was on 17th July, 1617, admitted a burgess under the designation of “James Bowie, sergeant of His Majesty’s cellars”- a whole list of the King’s servants being admitted at the same time.
    The ludging forms the east side of the courtyard, which is about 60 feet long by 30 feet wide, and thus faces the gateway. It is two storeys in height, with corbie-stepped gables, and has two dormer windows to the back. It had formerly two to the front, but only one now remains, considerable alterations having, within the last fifty years, been made on the ludging and court. The dormers all have different terminals. A remarkable feature is the finely-moulded front doorway of the ludging itself, with carved lintel (nearly concealed by a modern excresence of an outside stair to the upper flat. This carved lintel had escaped notice until discovered by Mr. Fleming. It is not improbable that before Bowie’s time the “great ludging” had belonged to the Shaws of Knockhill, who became extinct prior to 1626. Andrew Baird, a successor of the Bowies, is stated in a sasine to be in possession of the house pertaining of old to George Schaw of Knockhill). The figures, and coat of arms (a scroll enclosing a deer’s head, with a feathered arrow and spear crossed), and the initials, I.B., 1626, apparently give its owners name and armorial bearings, with the date of erection.
    The windows in the gable to Irvine Place (“the street that leads to the Bridge”) are of a considerable height, and the front wall and gateway to the Court facing St. Mary’s Wynd are three feet thick. Several stones in the latter are very large, and the gate, from the marks of hinges in the arches, must have been a very heavy one. The arch stones are very finely cut, and are ornamental.
    The arrangement points to the ludging being without the protection of the town walls, and a fortress within itself, and from the then boundaries of the adjacent properites on the west side, belonging to a Duncan Watson in 1699, which are described as outside the Port Gate, this was then the case with Bowie’s Ludging.
    The Court was known in our early days as Bowie’s Court (In Wood’s Plan of 1820, this property is entered as belonging to a Mr. Bowie, who however, could scarcely have been a descendant of the old family, the Sergeant of His Majesty’s wine cellar having left no son). and Tradition correctly carries its tale for more than 200 years-another evidence of tradition seldom erring, though often exaggerating.
    In 1745, the Mary Wynd Port Gate existed, as we find a charge for two locks for Mary Wynd Port and Friars Wynd Port Gates in the town’s accounts of the threatened siege by the rebels (Rising of ’45-ed.) (Old Ludgings of Stirling, Eneas MacKay, 1897, p.61-69). (Note this book has drawings of the building and his arms). This quote apparently of a land transaction mentions only two daughters, it was mentioned he had 9 children, thus 7 boys. James is implied to be the oldest based on inheritance.

    BOWIE’S COURT, ST. MARY’S WYND.
    BOWIE’S Court and House (now removed to make way for a new and better opening into Irvine Place, or what was known by old folks as the ” Back-o’-Toon “) was entered from St. Mary’s Wynd by an archway (shown in picture), the court being enclosed by houses and high walls. There is nothing of intei’est known in connection with the buildings, except that they were erected in 1626 by James Bowie, Sergeant of His Majesty’s Cellars, who was admitted a burgess of the town on 17th July, 1617. (Auld Biggins of Stirling, Eneas McKay)

    The Stirling Mansion of James Bowie Master of James VI s wine cellars with his crest a Bull’s Head and initials and date 1626 now alas quite removed and its site built on (before 1905).(Transactions of the Glasgow Archaeological Society p.58).

    But a few years later the King placed all his confidence in James Bovy, who was nominated Sergeant of the Cellar, and is usually referred to as the Purveyor of Wines to the Royal…of going to Bordeaux every year, and there make a suitable provision of wines ” upon the place where they grow. … to pay James Bovy £451 10s. in discharge of bills given by him and Monsieur de Vitry(gouverneur de Meaux), for provision of French wines for the … The history of the wine trade in England – Volume 3 – Page 14 André Louis Simon,1964).(to date this its after he took over, and while vitry is governor of meaux).

    1661 at Whitehall Sept 30th Petition of James Fenton to the King, for the place of Yeoman of the Wine-cellar to the Queen, to keep him from want Was 12 years servant to Mr. Bovy, Serjeant of the cellar to the two late Kings ; served the House of Peers in the Long Parliament,, in 1641 ; had charge of the late King’s plate ; was seriously wounded in an attempt to defend it from being stolen at night, by some thieves who came into the yeoman usher’s chamber, and spent most of his subsistence on his cure. With order thereon for Sec. Nicholas to put him on the list from which the servants are to be chosen. Annexing, Certificate by Lord Chamberlain Manchester, Lord Howard of Andover, and five other noblemen, in favour of the petitioner. (This mentions James Bowie working under King James and Charles I, now his servant of 12 years asking Charles II after restoration for the place of Yoeman of the Wine cellar to the Queen, see mention of him in 1633 above).(Calendar of state papers / Domestic series / Reign of Charles II …, Volume 2 By F. H. Blackburne Daniell p100)(this mentions two late Kings, but not late James Bovy, implies he may be alive at this point).

    A later mention of James Lands in Cannongate on High Street, later to his daughter Anna, and thence by Marriage to Scott of Spencerfield lines. the acquisitive Bowies appear by this time to have acquired all or most of the original Gilbert Cleugh properties
    The property is defined as: on the south side of the High Street between the lands formerly of Sergeant James Bowie, now of John Scott of Spenserfield … Dame Margaret Douglas early in 1668, after negotiations with Spencerfield and his son (who was acting as his father’s factor) starting in October 1667.

    Note: one child may be named Jeremy by Scots naming tradition.

    • August 31, 2015 at 9:29 am

      Robert, thank you for the detailed history. I am now back from vacation so I’ll check it out thoroughly. Aaron

      • DEEMI
        September 2, 2015 at 6:46 pm

        Here is more on James Bowie , son to Jeromy, son to Andro Bowy, Gunnar to Queen Mary etc Note the interesting spelling here, it is one line of Bowies that has spellings of our name as Bowe, Bowye,Bowie Bowyie, Bowey, Buy, Boy, Bovy, Bovey, Boye M. de Bouye etc. a lesson for name spelling as a rule…this would be the son of Jerome Bowye, grandson of Andro Bowey. We continue to have an affiliation with the Earl of Mar since we were first in the King’s Household.We were Wine Keepers for the King from at least 1569-1646,. Thus we can say we were Wine Keepers for the King for at least 73 years, and before as gunnars, and beyond as messengers, a significant time in the turbulent changes that were happening in Scotland and Later in England. We find James Bowie serving as Master of the Kings Wines at first for Prince Henry in 1594,, then later by 1598 taking on his fathers duties to the King, after Jerome Bowie passes. He lives in at least three places. Bowies Ludging in Stirling on St. Mary’s Wynd, then in Cannongate, when King James moved to Holyrood Palace at Edinburgh, before 1601. Then down to the the Sill House in the Strand, near Durham House in London about 1614 with James VI/I, and further service until c. 1642, his sons continue to serve as messengers, and one is actually caputured and sent to the tower of London, possibly ending this line of Bowies, as the daughters appear to inherit property only. Of note there were nine children, and at this point we have traced four.21 November 1584, Halieruidhous. Gift to James Bowye, lawful son of Jerome Bowie, ‘sumblair’ to the King, ‘for his better intertenyment at the scholes and flurischeing in gude lettris,’ of two monks’ portions in the abbey of Dumfermeling, with chambers and yards, vacant by decease of denes Robert Broun and John Hoghart; the gift to be valid notwithstanding the act of Parliament anent provision for the guard. li, 117 v. (Register of the Privy Seal of Scotland Vol. VIII 1581-1584 p. 454). (Anent means alongside, so this implies he is in the King’s Gaurd as well.)(was he in the gaurd or his father ref?)1594 February James Bowie was made master of Prince Henry’s wine cellar and cuphouse ‘for life with such fees and duties as his father. (PS.1/67,fos.85r-v.)He apparently takes over right away in his fathers duties after his father Jerome Bowie’s passing. He is appointed Master of the King’s wine cellar and sommelie (PS 1/69 fo.176r)1598 Item to Patrik Ronnald baxter Cristell Lamb maister cuke in the kingis grace kiching Frances Galbraith maister in his grace pantrie James Bog maister in his hienes aill sellar Walter Neische maister in the lairdnar and James Bowie maister in the wyne sellar everie ane of thame takand ane hundreth merkfs summa 400 (1598-9 REGUM SCOTORUM p.279 )1598 Anne of Denmark favored Rheinish wines, and ordered them while at dalkeith and holyrood in 1598.1601 James Bowie paid as sommelier 200L for “wissitting testing and wyling’ of the King’s wines. (E.24/22,fo41r.)James Bowie moves to Edinburg and lives at Cannongate as the King had moved his household to Holyrood. The Bowies owned a large part of the land which now is under the new Modern Parliment house at Cannongate. (goes to his daughter and then to the Scott of Spencerfield by marriage).He christens his first child in Edinburg in 1601

      • DEEMI
        September 2, 2015 at 7:14 pm

        James Bowie Messenger etc, son to James, son to Jerome, Son to Andro the implication is that they not only were winekeepers, but also diplomatic messengers and were carrying messages as part of the wine trips to france etc. see this 1659 After several difficult journeys successfully performed, in the winter before His Majesty’s happy restoration, he was sent over into Flanders, from whence returning with letters, he upon his landing at Dover, was seized by a party of soldiers,who waited for him: the Rebels’ spy, who was employed by them in His Majesty’s court, having given notice of his despatch; and described particularly his person and his habit. But notwithstanding this diligence of the Rebels, Mr. Allestree had so much presence of mind, to secure his letters, and shift them into a faithful hand, who took care of them. The soldiers according to their orders guarded him to London, where he was examined by a Committee of the Council of Safety, and charged with having correspondence with the King, and having brought letters from him, which they backed with several circumstances of his journey, and threats of utmost severity in case he should persist in contumacy, and not confess the truth. But they not being able by questions to entrap, nor menaces to fright Mr. Allestree to betray either himself or others, he was sent prisoner to Lambeth House, which was then made a gaol for the King’s friends, where by ill-usage he contracted a sickness which was like to have cost him his life. After the durance of about six or eight weeks, his friends made means for his enlargement, which was the easier obtained, for that some of the leaders of the party, seeing things move towards His Majesty’s restoration, were willing by kindnesses to recommend themselves in case of a revolution; among whom was the late Earl of Shaftesbury, who was used to value himself that Mr. Allestree owed his preservation to him. Mr. Allestree, having obtained liberty, returned to Oxfordshire. further possible bovey line On the east wall is a brass with a long inscription to ‘Edmund Barret Serjant of ye wine cellar to King Charles who died in his 65th year, Augst 17° 1631, and his wife Dorothie Apsley who bore him 3 sons, Thoms Edmund & John, & one daughtr Constance. His second wife Ruth Causten bore him 3 sonns, Robert, Francis & Edward, and 2 daughtr Ruth & Margaret; also his eldest sonn Thomas Barret Clerk of ye wardrobe to King Charles April 28 1632 aged 36 s.p.’On the east end of the south wall is a marble cartouche to Frances daughter of Samuel and Ann Peirson. She was born 30 September 1690, and died 31 May 1693. Another elaborately carved cartouche on this wall is to James Bovey, who died in 1695, and Margareta his wife, who died in 1714. (should not be him) From: ‘Parishes: Cheam’, A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 4 (1912), pp. 194-199. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=43051 Date accessed: 17 May 2010.James Bovey Esquire, who died in 1695; Edmund Barret, serjeant of the wine-cellar to King Charles, who died in 1631; and his son Thomas, clerk of the wardrobe, who died in 1652: of these, the tombs of Mr. Bovey and the Barrets only now remain. From: ‘Cheam’, The Environs of London: volume 1: County of Surrey (1792), pp. 137-158. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=45375) Later lines may include in the AmericasJames Bowie died a Bachelor and died in 1787 (?1778). He left part of his property to his brother John. He left a large silver tankard marked J.B.K.E. to his namesake and nephew James Bowie. A tankard is a tall one handled drinking vessel, especially a silver or pewter mug with a lid. There were also tankards enclosing a coin either in the foot, or in the hollow knop of the stem, rarely in an interior blub. It was a useful device fro expressing Jacobite or anti-Jacobite sympathies with either a Stuart or a Hanover coin.In July 1, 1691, James Bowie was one of the Kings Guard and has a child buried at Greyfriars buryingground. This James we do not have his lineage but shows a Bowie in the kings service in 1691 over 150 years since the first Andro Bowy.(Register of interments in the Greyfriars buryingground, Edinburgh, 1658-1700 p66)

  1. August 20, 2015 at 4:06 pm

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