Home > Tasting Notes and Wine Reviews > The 2012 Burgundy blogger and industry night at MacArthur Beverages.

The 2012 Burgundy blogger and industry night at MacArthur Beverages.


The 2012 vintage in Burgundy was troubled by destruction from hail, coulure, and millerandage.  While this ultimately resulted in a significant reduction in the amount of wine produced, what was made is regarded as very good.   That combination of small amounts of very good wine certainly drove up prices but as I recently learned, there is still good wine to be found in all ranges.  This experience came at the annual blogger and industry night at MacAthur Beverages.  Organized by Phil Bernstein, we were treated to six wines from generic red Burgundy at $22 per bottle all the way to Corton Grand Cru at $220 per bottle. I cannot draw any conclusions from such a tasting but let me just say that I was generally pleased by the fruit, acidity, and ability to age.  Last night, I even dreamed of drinking Burgundy.

Burgundy1

2012 Joseph Faiveley, Pinot Noir, Bourgogne – $22
Imported by Frederick Wildman & Sons.  Alcohol 13%.  There were spiced red fruit aromas followed by grapey,  young fruit in the mouth.  There was more red fruit with the structure immediately apparent with wood notes returning in the finish.  I would cellar this for a year or two.

Burgundy2

2012 Joseph Drouhin, Cotes de Nuits-Villages – $25
Imported by Dreyfus, Ashby & Co.  This wine is 100% Pinot Noir that was fermented with indigenous yeast then age for 12-15 months in French oak.  Alcohol 13%.  There was a pretty nose with some sweet aromas.  In the mouth was watering acidity, red and black fruit, and less obvious structure.  Though young, this wine was accessible, with developing raspberry candy flavors and eventually some structure.  I think it showed better definition with air.

Burgundy3

2012 Domaine Joblot, Clos du Cellier aux Moines, Givry 1er Cru – $45
Imported by Robert Kacher Selections.  This wine is 100% Pinot Noir that was fermented in barrel with indigenous yeast then aged for up to 16 months in 50% new oak.  Alcohol 13%.  In the mouth were blacker, dark floral flavors followed by a vein of fruit.  The black fruit remained focused, showing weight, a little more structure, and watering acidity.  Will age.

Burgundy4

2012 Louis Jadot, Domaine Gagey, Beaune 1er Cru Les Greves – $50
Imported by MacArthur Liquors.  Alcohol 13.5%.  There were smoky hints to the black, floral aromas.  In the mouth were black fruit flavors that were finely ripe and texture.  The acidity kept the wine moving along as tannins were left on the gums.  The wood flavor does come out.  Needs a few years to absorb the wood but should develop quite well.

Burgundy5

2012 Domaine Heresztyn-Mazzini, Gevrey-Chambertin 1er Cru Les Champonnets – $100
Imported by MacArthur Liquors.  This wine is 100% Pinot Noir sourced from vines planted in 1972.  The fruit was fermented with indigenous yeast then aged for 16-18 months in 40-50% new oak.   Alcohol 13%.  There was a serious but tight nose.  In the mouth the acidity and structure were perfectly integrated with the raspberry and mineral, black fruit.  The fine grained tannins suggested several years of aging are required.

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2012 Domaine Faiveley, Corton Grand Cru Clos des Cortons Faiveley – $220
Imported by Frederick Wildman and Sons.  This wine is 100% Pinot Noir sourced from vines planted between 1936 and 2002.  It was fermented in a combination of stainless steel and wooden vats then aged for 16 to 18 months in mostly new oak. Alcohol 13%.  The complex nose made way to concentrated, complex, and gently spiced flavors in the mouth.  There was broad ripeness, lipsticky raciness, and black graphite flavors.  Very attractive now this will unfurl with further time in the cellar.  Lovely.

Burgundy7

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