Home > History of Wine > Vineyards in the cadastral maps of Oedheim (1780)

Vineyards in the cadastral maps of Oedheim (1780)


If you enjoy both German wine and the history of wine then chances are you have heard of the Saar und Mosel Weinbau-Karte published by the Trier Public Library and available from Lars Carlberg.  This map is particularly important because it ranks vineyards based on net profit.  German archives are full of vineyards maps.  Today’s post featured three maps from the Flurkartenatlas über den Ort Oedheim (1780) which is a bound atlas for Oedheim.  Oedheim is a small town in Baden-Württemberg which is located in the south west of Germany.   The atlas contains cadastral maps which are a specific type that reflect a comprehensive survey of the land.  The maps highlight all property boundaries as well as differentiating between land use such as vineyards, meadows, and forests.  Geographic features, bridges, roads, and buildings are also included.  All of this information was used both for ownership and taxation purposes.

Tractus VI: "Von N(ume)ro 2347 usqu(e) 2734 incluse: begreiffet in sich Aecker und Wiesen in der Au, beim Mutzenberg, dann Weinberg und Aecker im Mutzenberg an der Degmarner Marckung". Landesarchivs Baden-Württemberg.  [1]

Tractus VI: “Von N(ume)ro 2347 usqu(e) 2734 incluse: begreiffet in sich Aecker und Wiesen in der Au, beim Mutzenberg, dann Weinberg und Aecker im Mutzenberg an der Degmarner Marckung”. Landesarchivs Baden-Württemberg. [1]

The Saar und Mosel Weinbau-Karte spans a large region so it differentiates more at the per-vineyard level.  The maps from Flurkartenatlas über den Ort Oedheim show individual property holdings within specific vineyards.  I find this detail fantastic! If you take a close look, the individual holdings give you a sense of the topography.

Tractus VII: "Von N(ume)ro 2901 usqu(e) ad N(ume)rum 3186 incluse: enthaltet in sich das sammtliche Feld gegen Kochendorf, im Ranzenloch genannt, die Weinberge in der Klückenhalden und Hofäcker". Landesarchivs Baden-Württemberg. [2]

Tractus VII: “Von N(ume)ro 2901 usqu(e) ad N(ume)rum 3186 incluse: enthaltet in sich das sammtliche Feld gegen Kochendorf, im Ranzenloch genannt, die Weinberge in der Klückenhalden und Hofäcker”. Landesarchivs Baden-Württemberg. [2]

Tractus XXIII: "jenseits dem Kocher von N(ume)ro 570 usqu(e) ad N(ume)rum 982 incluse: begreifet in sich Wiesen und Gaertten im Fahr Aecker, Weinberg und Baumgaertten im Kochersberg, die Uhrigsaecker und der Salle, dann das Banzische Waeldlein und einige Wiesen im Balzig". Landesarchivs Baden-Württemberg. [3]

Tractus XXIII: “jenseits dem Kocher von N(ume)ro 570 usqu(e) ad N(ume)rum 982 incluse: begreifet in sich Wiesen und Gaertten im Fahr Aecker, Weinberg und Baumgaertten im Kochersberg, die Uhrigsaecker und der Salle, dann das Banzische Waeldlein und einige Wiesen im Balzig”. Landesarchivs Baden-Württemberg. [3]


[1] Tractus VI: “Von N(ume)ro 2347 usqu(e) 2734 incluse: begreiffet in sich Aecker und Wiesen in der Au, beim Mutzenberg,… / Bild 1. 1780. Landesarchiv Baden-Wurttemberg. URL: http://www.landesarchiv-bw.de/plink/?f=1-772559-1
[2] Tractus VII: “Von N(ume)ro 2901 usqu(e) ad N(ume)rum 3186 incluse: enthaltet in sich das sammtliche Feld gegen Kochen… / Bild 1.  1780. Landesarchiv Baden-Wurttemberg. URL: http://www.landesarchiv-bw.de/plink/?f=1-772561-1
[3] Tractus XXIII: “jenseits dem Kocher von N(ume)ro 570 usqu(e) ad N(ume)rum 982 incluse: begreifet in sich Wiesen und … / Bild 1.  1780. Landesarchiv Baden-Wurttemberg. URL: http://www.landesarchiv-bw.de/plink/?f=1-772577-1

  1. September 9, 2014 at 10:32 am

    Thanks for the shout-out, Aaron. On a visit to Van Volxem, I saw an 1820 cadastral map of Wawern, which shows the vineyard area of this Saar village in much more detail.

    • September 9, 2014 at 10:39 am

      You are welcome. Sounds amazing. Do you have any sense of how many rows or vines an individual might own?

      • September 9, 2014 at 10:49 am

        Today, it seems a grower can lease or own just a few rows of vine, but I really don’t know the law in Germany.

  2. September 9, 2014 at 10:53 am

    Hi Aaron, great post. Your recent historical series has been excellent.

    There must be a treasure trove of fascinating old material in the remaining archives all over Germany and I’m glad to see more and more is being digitized.

    • September 9, 2014 at 10:59 am

      Hi John, thanks for commenting and I’m thrilled you are enjoying the historical pieces. There is so much newly digitized information out there I am almost overwhelmed! Social, medical, and scientific historians are writing fabulous pieces using these archives but almost no one when it comes to wine. Hopefully people check out my references and get inspired.

  3. September 9, 2014 at 11:31 am

    In Trier, the problem is that many of the old documents, periodicals, books, and maps were destroyed during the Second World War or were thrown away in the postwar period. The other issue is that the archive doesn’t have the budget to hire more staff to scan all the remaining stuff. For example, I would love to have a certain Mainz-based weekly scanned. It’s an amazing record of the German wine scene, much like those that are already online.

    • September 9, 2014 at 4:28 pm

      Lars, it is a shame that much has been destroyed or thrown yet. It is incredible though, that there is so much more to be digitized or to even simply have search aides put online. There needs to be a fund to scan wine-related materials from around the world!

      Aaron

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