Home > History of Wine > The 1843 Auction of Thomas Bloodgood’s Old Madeira

The 1843 Auction of Thomas Bloodgood’s Old Madeira


The Island of Madeira with the Brig Comet Thomas Ormston Master entering the Bay of Funchal. Duncan, E. 1831. PAF7720. Image from National Maritime Museum.

The Island of Madeira with the Brig Comet Thomas Ormston Master entering the Bay of Funchal. Duncan, E. 1831. PAF7720. Image from National Maritime Museum.

Thomas Bloodgood was a president of the City Bank, a wine merchant near Fulton Market, and an agent for the Bloodgood nurseries in Flushing.[0]  After Mr. Bloodgood’s death in 1843,  the wine cellar was auctioned off by his executors on December 21, 1843, at the City Hotel in New York City.[1]  Two days after the auction the sales results were published.[2]  This was a significant cellar of which the Madeira alone spanned the vintages of 1754 to 1836.  Many of the producers and ships appear throughout the history of Madeira advertisements.  The Madeira imported by Mr. Bloodgood appears in advertisements over the years as generic” Bloodgood” in 1845[3] to more specific “Bloodgood, imported in 1835” at the sale of Chester Jennings’ wines in 1848[4].  “Old Bloodgood” was even served at the September 17, 1850, supper given by the Cincinnati Independent Fire Co.[5]  In this post I have reproduced the list of Madeira as it appeared in newspaper.  I have left out the unidentified lots of Madeira.

  • 1754 Madeira, sent by Mr. Oliviera as a present, 2 cases
  • 1754 Madeira, sent to Mr. Bloodgood as a present from Madeira, one bottle, at $5
  • 1779 Mary Elizabeth, 12 demijohns, $4.50-$5 per gallon
  • 1790 Madeira, sent to Mr. Bloodgood as a present from Madeira, one bottle at $5
  • 1791 Blackburn, from the private stock of the late Thomas Tom, 38 bottles at $2.75 each
  • Blackburn, bottled 18[?]6, drawn out for rebottling 1836, 30 demijohns, $4 per gallon
  • Pre-1800 Madeira, from Mr. Bloodgood’s private stock, who received it on the division of Mr. Tom’s wine, 18 bottles, $4.50 per bottle
  • 1794 Madeira, sent to Mr. Bloodgood as a present from Madeira, two bottles, $5 each
  • 1798 Monteiro Madeira, bottled in 1808, rebottled in 1830, 17 bottles at $3 each
  • 1800 Madeira, sent to Mr. Bloodgood as a present from Madeira, two bottles, $5 each
  • 1800 Madeira, 5 years in Calcutta, imported into Baltimore 1808, six dozen, $14 per dozen
  • 1800 Madeira, 5 years in Calcutta, imported into Baltimore 1808, 30 demijohns, $4-$4.50 per gallon
  • 1803 Crawford, bottled 1808, rebottled 1836, 160 bottles at $2-$2.12 each
  • 1803 Newton Gordon Murdock, 3 pipes
  • 1803 Madeira of late Robt. Lennox, Esq., 200 half-gallon bottles, at $1.75 each
  • 1805 Craford Madeira, in demijohns and bottles
  • Calcutta Madeira, three years in Calcutta, imported in 1806, two pipes, $13.50 per dozen
  • 1808 Buchanan Teneriffe, in demijohns, 40 bottles at $3.50 each
  • 1808 St. Anna Madeira, in demijohns and bottles
  • 1808 Choice Malmsy Leacoch
  • 1808 Blackburn, 40 dozen in half gallons and quarts
  • 1809 “Olevelra “
  • 1812 Leacock Madeira, bottled 18[?]8, rebottled 1837,32 dozen, $24 to $27 per dozen
  • 1812 Leacock Madeira, supposedly, recently rebottled, 153 half-gallon magnums, $1.81 each
  • Pre-1820, very old, 11 bottles at $2.75 each
  • Pre-1820, red seal, very old, 47 bottles at $3-$3.50 each
  • Pre-1820, very old and dry, 18 bottles at $2 each
  • 1820 Oliveria, 48 magnums, $1.50-$1.63 each
  • 1820 Oliveria, six dozen bottles, $9.25 per dozen
  • 1820 Oliveria, 30 demijohns, at $3.25 per gallon
  • 1822 Pomona, bottled 1843, 12 dozen, at $13.5 per dozen
  • 1822 Pomona, bottled 1843, six demijohns, at $4.50 per gallon
  • Pomona, imported in 1824, two pipes, $2.56 per gallon
  • Juno, two and a half pipes
  • Juno, imported 1822, bottled in 1843, 12 dozen, $1.50-$1.75 each bottle
  • Juno, imported 1822, bottled in 1843, 11 demijohns, $4.50-$5 per gallon
  • 1823 Howard March Madeira, two butts
  • 1825, imported by the Cazenove in 1838, three quarter-casks, at $3.[illegible] per gallon
  • 1825 P. J. Monterio & Co., imported 1835 by the Madrid, cased, 3 quart-casks, at $3.25 per gallon
  • Howard, imported 1825 from J. Howard, March & Co, 9 pipes and 1 butt, at $3.25 per gallon
  • 18[?]9 Mary Elizabeth, 24 demijohns
  • 1828 Ivanough, bottled 1834, 23 bottles, at $0.85 each
  • 1831 Indian Queen, one pipe and two half pipes
  • Ivanough, imported 1831, one quarter-cask, at $3 per gallon
  • [illegible] Anna, a fine old wine, imported by Messrs F. Stevens & sons, purchased in 1833, $19 per dozen
  • Madeira, imported by the San Francisco in 1832, two half-pipes, at $2 per gallon
  • Ivanough, imported 1834, two quarter-casks, at $3 per gallon
  • 1834 Goiconda, one quarter-cask
  • Howard Madeira, very choice wine of the highest cost, imported in 1835 from J&H March & Co., 36 demijohns, $4.[illegible] – $5 per gallon
  • Monteiro, imported 1835 by the India, two quarter-casks, $2.25-$3 per gallon
  • Olivera & Co., imported 1836 by Oucco, one pipe, $3.25 per gallon
  • 1836 Oneco Madeira, one pipe
  • Newton, Gordon, Murdock & Co., 34 pipes
  • Monteiro, per ship India, four pipes, 10 and one-third pipes, and four quarter-casks
  • Very choice Oliviera, three pipes
  • Arthur T. Taylor Madeira, a very delicate Light Wine, 24 demijohns

[0] Barrett, Walter. The Old Merchants of New York City, Volume 5. 1885. URL: http://books.google.com/books?id=thIwAAAAIAAJ&pg=PP1#v=onepage&q&f=false
[1] Date: Saturday, December 2, 1843                 Paper: Commercial Advertiser (New York, NY)   Volume: XLVI   Page: 3
[2] Date: Saturday, December 23, 1843              Paper: Spectator (New York, NY)   Page: 2
[3] Date: Friday, April 18, 1845             Paper: Commercial Advertiser (New York, NY)   Volume: XLVIII   Page: 1
[4] Date: Friday, December 29, 1848                   Paper: Daily National Intelligencer (Washington (DC), DC)   Volume: XXXVI   Issue: 11183   Page: 4
[5] Date: Wednesday, July 21, 1909     Paper: Cincinnati Post (Cincinnati, OH)   Page: 4
Categories: History of Wine Tags:
  1. December 19, 2013 at 3:31 pm

    Nice historical report. What a beautiful wine!

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