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Some Good French Wines From Saint-Peray to Maury


Reading multiple posts about Wine and the Sea is certainly thirsty work.  Any of the wines featured in this post would be a worthy choice.  I am afraid I am a little slow in posting about the wines of Les Vins de Vienne, a collaboration between Cuilleron, Villard, and Gaillard.  The 2010 Les Vins de Vienne, Les Cranilles was an excellent selection but it appears to be out of stock.  Instead you could go with the 2011 Les Vins de Vienne, Saint-Peray which is drinking well right now.   The Chateau Saint-Roch of Lafage is producing interesting wine.  The 2011 Maison Lafage, Chateau Saint-Roch, Kerbuccio is good wine for the money and only the second dry red wine I have had from Maury.  This bottle carries the Maury Sec designation which was first allowed for the 2011 vintage.  The other dry Maury is the 2010 Sarl Fractured, Shatter.   The 2009 Maison Lafage, Chateau Saint-Roch, Chimeres is still young and a little raw at this point, I would cellar it a little longer.  It has been one year since I last tasted the 2010 Domaine d’Aupilhac, Montpeyroux.  It is becoming more approachable but it is best to continue waiting.  These wines were purchased at MacArthur Beverages.

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2011 Les Vins de Vienne, Saint-Peray – $25
Imported by DHI.  This wine is 100% Marsanne aged 9 months in barrels and tanks.  Alcohol 13.5%.  The color was a light yellow straw.  There was a light and tight nose.  In the mouth the wine had a round, glycerin infused body with focused white fruit, good acidity, and minerals.  There were dried herbs and drier flavors in the finish which left minerals and lightly salivating acidity.  *** Now.

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2010 Les Vins de Vienne, Les Cranilles, Cotes du Rhone – $17
Imported by DHI.  This wine is a blend of 60% Grenache, 30% Syrah, and 10% Mourvedre aged for 12 months in tanks and barrels.  Alcohol 14.5%.  The nose was light with focused, fruity and grapey aromas.  In the mouth were youthful, concentrated flavors which were almost tart.  There was red and black fruit, acidity which worked very well, and some developing ripeness.  With air there was a little smoke and bacon flavor in the finish.  It had good tannic texture, nice ripe tannins, and red grapey flavors in the finish. Nice wine.  *** Now – 2020.

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2009 Maison Lafage, Chateau Saint-Roch, Chimeres, Cotes du Roussillon Villages – $15
Imported by Eric Solomon.  This wine is a blend of 40% Grenache, 30% Carignan, 20% Syrah, and 10% Mourvedre.  The Grenache and Carignan are sourced from vines 50+ years of age.  Alcohol 15%.  The nose was a little reductive at first, eventually revealing macerated fruit aromas.  In the mouth were pungent, red fruit flavors, grapey tannins, and almost citric acidity on the back of the tongue.  It was tangy with a little weight to some red and blue flavors.  It was a little raw in nature.  **(*) 2015-2019.

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2011 Maison Lafage, Chateau Saint-Roch, Kerbuccio, Maury Sec –  $20
Imported by Eric Solomon.  This wine is a blend of 40% Syrah, 30% Mourvedre, and 30% Grenache sourced from vines on black schist soil which was aged for 8 months in concrete tanks. Alcohol 15%.  The nose was slightly reticent.  In the mouth were good focused fruit flavors of floral black fruit and black tea.  There was integrated acidity and structure with tannins reminiscent of fine stones.  The wine was almost chewy before the long, expansive aftertaste.  ***(*) Now-2023+.

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2010 Domaine d’Aupilhac, Montpeyroux, Coteaux du Languedoc – $19
Imported by Kermit Lynch.  This wine is a blend of 30% Mourvedre, 25% Syrah, 25% Carignan, 16% Grenache, and 4% Cinsault.  It was fermented with indigenous yeasts then aged for 20 months in old foudres and oak barrels.  Alcohol 14%.  Though still young this is becoming more approachable.  The level of very fine and strong tannins suggest further aging is best.  **(*) 2014-2022.

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