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A Variety of Wines Including Good Beaujolais-Villages and Cerasuolo di Vittoria


Before I met Phil and Lou I did not drink much wine from Beaujolais.  I still do not automatically reach for a bottle but I am now always willing to try a recommendation and have gained new appreciation for these wines.  The 2011 Chateau Gaillard, Beaujolais-Villages is one such recommendation from Phil which drank particularly great on the second night.  That is the key, a satisfying wine which is easy to drink and affordable.  The 2010 Centonze, Cerasuolo di Vittoria packed in more flavor than I expected.  It drank best with some sir so either double-decant it or wait until the new year.  The 2012 Compania de Vinos del Atlantico, La Cartuja is an affordable value from Priorat which has a bit of everything including minerality.  I tasted the 2010 Domaine Durand, Les Coteaux over a period of 12 hours and never found it particularly engaging for the price.  It is quite approachable in a sense but it did improve with air and I believe it does need a few years to better integrate.  I would spend $2 more to get the 2009 Domaine Barral, Faugeres.  Lastly the 2008 Triennes, St. Auguste remained firm with a structure that overpowered the fruit and ultimately was not a wine that Jenn and I wanted to drink.  These wines are available at MacArthur Beverages.

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2011 Chateau Gaillard, Beaujolais-Villages – $13
Imported by Oslo Enterprises.  This wine is 100% Gamay.  Alcohol 13%.  The color was a light to medium cranberry ruby.  The nose revealed a little pepper with light, ripe cranberry red fruit.  There was a slight lifted note of citrus.  In the mouth was moderately ripe red fruit with acidity on the tongue.  With air the flavors became a bit denser with good texture in the aftertaste.  It left tannins on the lips and gums.  *** Now – 2015.

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2010 Centonze, Cerasuolo di Vittoria – $17
Imported by deGrazia Imports.  This wine is a blend of Nero d’Avola and Frappato sourced from limestone soils which was fermented then aged for six months in stainless steel.  Alcohol 13.5%.  There was a little pungent nose, perhaps with tar and some other scent.  In the mouth were red and black fruit flavors which were a little tangy with acidity on the tongue tip.  It then became juicy with a grapey and citric aspect.  The moderate structure was appropriate for the good flavors.  This packed in more than I suspected.  **(*) 2014-2017.

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2012 Compania de Vinos del Atlantico, La Cartuja, Priorat – $15
Imported by OLE.  This wine is a blend of 70% Garnacha and 30% Carinena.  There was a subtle nose of good fruit and “fresh cut grass” according to Jenn.  In the mouth the wine had a certain athletic poise with its black fruit.  It had slightly juicy acidity, a reasonably drying structure of crushed stones, and a little tart finish.  This sappy, young wine was fresh tasting with moderate acidity.  *** Now-2017.

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2010 Domaine Durand, Les Coteaux, Saint-Joseph – $28
Imported by LVDH.  Alcohol 14%.  The nose revealed smoky tobacco, black fruit, and some toast.  In the mouth were good ripe but firm fruit flavors.  The wine was rugged in its youth with black fruit which was linearly delivered before dropping off in the finish.  It left impressions of toast and black fruit.  **(*) 2015-2023.

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2008 Triennes, St. Auguste, VdP du Var – $17
Imported by The Sorting Table.  This wine is a blend of 50% Syrah, 40% Cabernet Sauvignon, and 10% Merlot which was aged for 12 months in used oak barrels followed by 10 months in tank.  Alcohol 13.5%.  The nose revealed a little fruit aromas along with greenhouse and some wood box.  In the mouth this was a firm wine with black fruit, drying structure, and hollow flavors towards the finish.  It was a bit tart with nice acidity and moderate structure.  The structure continued to overpower the fruit.  * Now but should last to 2018.

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