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Spanish and American Wines Made by Spaniards


Earlier this summer I really enjoyed the 2010 Idilico, Graciano made by the Spaniard Javier Alfonso.  You may read about this wine in my post Trying a Few New Wines in Seattle. During that trip I stopped by Pike & Western Wine Shop where Jeremy helped me out with some selections.  There was a large range of Idilico wines so I picked up the 2010 Idilico, Monastrell and the 2010 Idilico, Tempranillo.  The Monastrell was the youngest wine of the three I tried and will benefit from cellaring.  I do not think it will reach the level of the Tempranillo and Graciano.  The Tempranillo and Graciano respond really well to air, you can feel them become more expressive in the mouth.  I rather like these two wines and think they are attractive for the price.  They are worth looking for.  The wines of Bodegas Marañones are made by Fernando “Fer” Garcia who produces these “natural wines” from old vines located on granite soils.  As Garcia is interested in terroir he is a member of Chicos del Terruar.  Both the Marañones and Labros were interesting, for they are produced the same so they highlight the characteristics of the plots.  The former showed attractive strawberry flavors and the later engaged with minerals.  Give both of them a go but be sure to cellar them at least one year.  These wines are available at Pike & Western Wine Shop in Seattle.

Spanish2

2011 Vinateria Idilico, Monastrell, Upland Vineyard – $20
Alcohol 13.5%.  The nose was tight with ripe red fruit.  In the mouth the flavors open up after a few hours of air to reveal low-lying and expansive flavors, integrated acidity, and a little juicy acidity at the end.  ** 2014-2018.

Spanish1

2010 Vinateria Idilico, Tempranillo – $20
This wine is 100% Tempranillo sourced from Snipes Mountain, Yakima Valley, and Horse Heaven which was aged in French oak for 12 months. Alcohol 14%.  The nose revealed a little leather, earth, and herbs.  In the mouth there were interesting flavors of black fruit, some tobacco, along with firm ripe tannins that were drying.  There was some vintgae perfume along with berries.  *** Now-2017.

Spanish3

2010 Bodega Marañones, Garnacha, Marañones, Madrid – $33
Imported by Louis/Dressner.  This wine is 100% Garnacha sourced from 50-70 year old vines from two plots at 750-850m.  It was whole cluster fermented in open top barrels using indigenous yeasts, underwent pigeage and foot treading, malolactic fermentation, then was aged on the lees for 12 months in used French oak barrels.  Alcohol 14.5%.  The nose was rather subtle with low-lying, dark red aromas.  There was good character in the mouth.  This young wine had finely ripe strawberry and black fruit.  The acidity was integrated and watering before the flavors became drier in a sense.  There was a hint of dried herbs and wood box with a firmer nature in the finish.  It feels like there was extract to match the structure.  Perhaps a touch of warmth breaking through.  *** 2015-2023.

Spanish4

2010 Bodega Marañones, Garnacha, Labros, Madrid – $33
Imported by Louis/Dressner.  This wine is 100% Garnacha sourced from 70 year old vines from a single 0.7 ha plot at 650m.  It was whole cluster fermented in open top barrels using indigenous yeasts, underwent pigeage and foot treading, malolactic fermentation, then was aged on the lees for 12 months in used French oak barrels.  Alcohol 14.5%.  The light nose revealed cherry aromas.  This wine was the more forward of the two with a firm but riper, powdery core of black and red fruit.  There were minerally black fruit in the middle along with ripe and drying tannins which coated the lips and teeth.  The long aftertaste bore persistent, mineraly black fruit.  This remained more forward with a little roughness in the aftertaste, this should settle with some age.  There were gobs of robust sediment at the end.  *** 2014-2023.

Spanish5

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