Home > History of Wine > “…a melancholy Description to the Injury done by the late Frost…” May 12, 1774

“…a melancholy Description to the Injury done by the late Frost…” May 12, 1774


The dialog between Colonel Robert Bolling, Jr. and Andrew Estave quieted down throughout the Fall and Winter of 1773.  In the Spring of 1774 it was Mother-Nature who offered no shelter from a devastating late frost.

From the Virginia Gazette, Purdie and Dixon, May 12, 1774, Page 4

WILLIAMSBURG, May 12.

ACCOUNTS from various Parts of the Country give a melancholy Description to the Injury done by the late Frost, which was the severest, at this Season of the Year, ever remembered.  The forward Wheat is greatly injured every Where, and in some Places ruined; the same may be said of the Tobacco Plants.  The Corn, which was generally come up, is demolished in such a Manner that it is feared it will never shoot out again, but may be all replanted.  The Fruit, of all Sorts, is destroyed ever Where but upon the Rivers; Vines, of all Kinds, are killed; and many of the Forest Trees have received such Injury that their Leaves are turned black and withering, so that there is but a bad Prospect of any Mast this Year. 

The Brilliant, Miller ( with Servants) and Martin, Clark, from London, the York, Rose, and ____, Benson, from Whitehave, are arrived in York River; and the Donald, Ramsay, from Glasgow, In James River.

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