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Wine Names from Colonial Williamsburg


Virginia Gazette, Publisher Parks, September 04,1746, Page 3, Image from The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

Virginia Gazette, Publisher Parks, September 04,1746, Page 3, Image from The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

Arrack – A distilled spirit produced through Asia and eastern Mediterranean.
Canary – Sweet Malvasia-based wines from the Spanish islands off the coast of Morocco.
Champaign – Champagne!
Claret – English name for red wines from Bordeaux.
Florence Wine – Wine from Tuscany.
French Coniack – The distilled spirit Cognac.
French White Wine – Not French red wine.
Hock and Old Hock – Wine from the Rhine regions of Germany, a contraction of hockamore which is the English of Hochheimer, meaning wines from Hochheim.
Lisbon and White Lisbon – Wine from Portugal.

Virginia Gazette, Publisher Purdie & Dixon, June 03, 1771, Page 3, Image from The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

Virginia Gazette, Publisher Purdie & Dixon, June 03, 1771, Page 3, Image from The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

Malmsey – English name for Malvasia, a sweet rich wine from Greece.
Mountain Wine – English name for Malaga, a fortified wine typically made from Pedro Ximenez in northern Spain.
Rennish – Wines from Germany and Alsace.
Sower Wine – Could this be sour wine, which is low-grade wine mixed with some vinegar to prevent it from spoiling?
Tent – English name for Tinto, referring to the strong red wines from Spain and Portugal
Tokay – Long-lived wines from Tokaji, Hungary.

Virginia Gazette, Publisher Purdie & Dixon, August 15,1771, Page 3, Image from The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

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